Cliches

Topics which don't quite fit into any other category

Re: Cliches

Postby Andy JS » 22 Nov 2013, 12:28

The Conservative MP for Mid Norfolk, George Freeman, has the following sentence at the top of his Twitter page:

Father of 2 children whose future I feel responsible for.


Maybe I'm a bit old-fashioned in finding this statement both redundant and sentimental.
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Re: Cliches

Postby Yessica » 22 Nov 2013, 14:14

Children
have become a cliche nowadays...

Some people in the media seem to think that because a person is able to produce children he or she must be moral superior/ right about anything.

I do not understand much about the war in Syria. I have no idea who is the good guy here or if there is any.... but something I noticed is how often it was mentioned that the rebels had children... as if that would make their opinion justified. Do Assads troops have no children?

The Nazis had litters of children, their ideolgy encouraged it.
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Re: Cliches

Postby Elliott » 22 Nov 2013, 14:57

I agree, Yessica. If nothing else is clear about Syria, it's clear that Western media have worked hard to make us sympathise with the rebels and not with Assad's troops. Yet the rebels seem to be just as vicious.
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Re: Cliches

Postby Michael » 25 Nov 2013, 21:52

"You can't judge a book by it's cover"


This cliche that is only true some of the time, both with regard to books and to people (the most usual extension of its scope).

Before reading further, check out some examples of Hilariously Bad Book Covers. Some of these are from self-published works available from Amazon and other online retailers, but quite a few were professionally published.

A good book cover is an indication of belief in a product by its publisher. Like film producers, publishers have to put out new books every year to stay in business - some of these can be reprintings of classics or best sellers, but there needs to be a number of new titles. Occasionally, the pickings are not good - another publisher could pay a larger advance or guarantee a larger royalty, and so the publisher is stuck with the secondary and tertiary picks. Knowing the products are likely to fail they cut costs where they can: the cover art.

Please don't misunderstand: there are good books with poor covers. The number of undiscovered gems in publishing is very large (if one takes into account the whole history of book publishing back to, let's say, the Diamond Sutra)

You can all make your own extension of the cliche to people.
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Re: Cliches

Postby Gavin » 25 Nov 2013, 22:08

Agreed - generally "You can't judge a book by its cover" is nonsense. I think TD has written of this a few times.

Even bearing this out in simple book terms, Spoilt Rotten has a bad cover and it is probably one of TD's weakest works (though still great by other people's standards) while Our Culture What's Left of It, with its striking cover, is surely one of his best!
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Re: Cliches

Postby Yessica » 26 Nov 2013, 06:45

I really enjoyed "Spoilt rotten".

Why do think it is weaker than his other works?
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Re: Cliches

Postby Gavin » 26 Nov 2013, 13:39

I'd have to have a good look through it again, to say why, Yessica. I think its title mismatched the content, it may have been a little harsh and it may have been just one idea extended into a book, unlike the others, which tend to have many themes. It was still good though, of course, and I don't think the cover did it justice. I think that whoever designed the cover probably hadn't read it - a wailing baby wasn't quite right to symbolise excessive sentimentality in society.
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Re: Cliches

Postby Gavin » 10 Dec 2013, 08:07

Spotted used in all seriousness on LinkedIn recently!
Attachments
Screen Shot 2013-12-09 at 10.png
Screen Shot 2013-12-09 at 10.png (8.21 KiB) Viewed 3560 times
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Re: Cliches

Postby Elliott » 10 Dec 2013, 12:25

LOL!
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Re: Cliches

Postby Gavin » 02 May 2014, 14:37

If I hear one more "basically" or "haitch-TML" or high rising terminal at work I think I'm going to go crazy! The superficiality of the general public is driving me mad too: every overheard conversation is shallow and idiotic, usually peppered with expletives. Thank goodness for earphones, and for this forum...

Unfortunately I now have to listen to the inane Chris Evans (who should have been sacked by the BBC years ago) during a lift to work too, but mercifully that is only for 20 minutes otherwise I fear what damage it might do to my mind!
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Re: Cliches

Postby Kevin R » 03 May 2014, 23:57

Gavin wrote:If I hear one more "basically" or "haitch-TML" or high rising terminal at work I think I'm going to go crazy!


Gavin.. do you mean the interrogative lift? Yeah?
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Re: Cliches

Postby Grant » 06 May 2014, 08:27

The one that grates with me is "actually". It means little but is used by so-called experts who use it to portray themselves as serious thinkers. I've developed a complex that results in a noticeable twitch every time it is used!
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Re: Cliches

Postby Mike » 06 May 2014, 09:55

Grant wrote:The one that grates with me is "actually". It means little but is used by so-called experts who use it to portray themselves as serious thinkers. I've developed a complex that results in a noticeable twitch every time it is used!


A work colleague and I used to keep a tally of the number of times a member of our senior executive at school used "actually" during her little staff harangues. It always got into the twenties.

In a somewhat troubling development, I've noticed that my daughter is starting to say "actually" a lot (especially when she's trying to argue her way out of trouble!).
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Re: Cliches

Postby Elliott » 06 May 2014, 11:49

Diane Abbott uses it all the time...
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Re: Cliches

Postby Paul » 06 May 2014, 20:45

We had a teacher at grammar school who was always using words ending in 'ly'. He didn't use many 'actuallys' that i recall but was fond of others.

We used to call him 'Basically Bob Foster', as this was his favourite. I never found out if his first name really (I nearly said actually there) was Bob, or Robert.

He used to like 'generally' too. Basically that was how he was!
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