Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

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Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Yessica » 28 May 2014, 13:44

Jonathan wrote:So whenever a non-PC opinion is expressed, you must distance yourself from it utterly to maintain your status. Not only must you show that you disagree, you must show that you could never be suspected of agreeing. Doing this duty carries certain pleasures, naturally, as you get to publicly humiliate someone while earning admiration of bystanders.

The higher your status, the greater the offense you must take; and taking offense at things which no-one else perceived as offensive will increase your status.


I have come across several bizarre -ism charges so far. Unfortunately I often forget about them because they make no sense. Next time I hear one I will write it into this thread.

However here is one I remember.
a feminist told me last christmas wrote:The song "jingle bells" is deeply misogynist because of the lines "Now the ground is white, go it while you’re young take the girls tonight and sing this sleighing song", which treats women like objects... and "You’ll take the lead" which says the man should be in a position of power
(little did she understand that the guy in question is in power over the horse, not the woman... and also that he seems to be quite clumsy, one of the stanzas is about him falling on his behind. A masculinist could interpret the song as anti-male)

I also like audism. Audism is the believe that being able to hear is preferable to being deaf. Cochlear implants, which can help children born deaf to hear, are condemned by some for being audist. Audism is a form of ableism. Ableism in turn is the believe that it is better to be healthy than to be disabled. Hence such inventions like vaccines.

What is the most bizarre -ism charge you ever heard of?

Might I propose a new one? Vita-ism: the believe that it is better to be alive than to be dead.
People having their children vaccinated against polio are not only guilty of ableism but also of vitaism.
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Yessica » 28 May 2014, 14:23

A poem by Siegfried Sasson has needs to be re-interpreted. We thought that he was being ironic and condeming wars... but no... he was condeming ableism.

Siegfried Sassoon wrote:Does it matter?—losing your legs?
For people will always be kind,
And you need not show that you mind
When the others come in after hunting
To gobble their muffins and eggs.

Does it matter?—losing your sight?...
There’s such splendid work for the blind;
And people will always be kind,
As you sit on the terrace remembering
And turning your face to the light.


Peace activists never understand that one *sigh* as they are hopelessly ableist and vitaist.
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Jonathan » 29 May 2014, 20:32

Best one I heard of - mind you, this was in a science fiction novel - was the "Voluntary Autist"s. Apparently a cure had been found for Autism, but there was a movement amongst autists not to use the cure. The reasoning was this: non-autistic people have a function in their brain which makes them empathize with others - that is, believe they can understand the emotions another human is feeling. But since each person is different, this is impossible, and their feeling is therefore a lie. The Voluntary Autists want to remain free of this lie, and therefore reject the so-called cure.

Why am I mentioning a fictional group? Well, in our world, satire sometimes turns out to be prophecy .
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Elliott » 30 May 2014, 00:36

Even worse than that is the Voluntary Human Extinction Movement!
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Yessica » 01 Jun 2014, 07:59

Jonathan wrote:Best one I heard of - mind you, this was in a science fiction novel - was the "Voluntary Autist"s. Apparently a cure had been found for Autism, but there was a movement amongst autists not to use the cure. The reasoning was this: non-autistic people have a function in their brain which makes them empathize with others - that is, believe they can understand the emotions another human is feeling. But since each person is different, this is impossible, and their feeling is therefore a lie. The Voluntary Autists want to remain free of this lie, and therefore reject the so-called cure.

Why am I mentioning a fictional group? Well, in our world, satire sometimes turns out to be prophecy .


As far as I know an autistic pride movement already does exist.

Have you heard about pride in neurodiversity? This is a worldview which exist not only among autistic people but also amongst some of those who for example suffered a stroke or traumatic brain injury.
It holds that a person afflicted by a stroke is not ill but only different from the rest of the population.

I think I can understand why a person with autism might have that world view. After all they do have some abilities (mathematical, memory and so on), which the rest of us do not have.

I cannot understand how having a stroke is seen as something good. May be a attempt to see the bright side of life? If it happened to you, you have lost important abilities you have to life with it, like it or not.

PC people like the victim and they like dislike -ism. They like the idea that problems basically only exist because of society's / middle class sqare's prejudices. That leads to one conclusion: not the stroke / the disability is the problem, but the people who treat the person with a stroke differently.

I wonder how one could treat a person who functions at the level of a three year old "the same as everybody else" without doing him wrong.

Having said this: There are people who have suffered a stroke or traumatic brain injury and still are saner and more intelligent than the rest of the population - albeit not thanks to the injury but despite of it. Of course I would not treat them like children.
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Elliott » 01 Jun 2014, 22:26

I think there is something really disgusting and irresponsible about people who try to re-cast disabilities and strokes as something "good". I think it is real moral indulgence, and patronising for the sufferers. These people should not be degraded, they should be helped - but the first thing is to acknowledge/admit that something unfortunate has befallen them. That is step 1. When people try to deny that, when they claim that a stroke isn't a disability or that dementia actually makes people more "themselves", I think what's going on is that they are, themselves, refusing to admit something terrible (that life is not perfect) and are trying to get the rest of us to go along with their delusion so that it lasts longer for them. It's actually selfishness on their part.
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Jonathan » 02 Jun 2014, 05:55

I think most of the support for this idea comes from those who are born with a disability. They grow up realizing that they are different from the other kids, and that there are many things they can't do. They realize (correctly) that it is grossly unfair that they should suffer this way. Growing up in a society which does not distinguish between unfairness and injustice (as Dalrymple likes to say), they cast about for someone to blame.

Relativism provides the first step to the solution. There is no good or bad, except as far as society has decided that something is good or bad. Stunted legs are not intrinsically bad because they're unsightly, prevent you from dancing or playing basketball. Society has unjustly decided they are ugly, that dancing is good, and that basketball hoops should be so high.

The last step is provided by Human Rights theory - specifically, the lack of distinction between negative rights (congress shall make no law... abridging the freedom of speech) and positive rights (congress will buy me and everyone else a microphone and speakers and set up a blog for me and I don't care who they tax to pay for it). If society has set such unjust rules for basketball, why, those rules must be changed. If I can't walk up so many steps, then someone must build a ramp and buy me a wheelchair and I don't care who pays for it, it's my right. If people use words to express their relief that they are not like me, why, those words must be removed from the language. Better the whole world should change, than I should feel bad about my disability.
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Lindsey » 02 Jun 2014, 14:26

If I can't walk up so many steps, then someone must build a ramp and buy me a wheelchair and I don't care who pays for it, it's my right. If people use words to express their relief that they are not like me, why, those words must be removed from the language. Better the whole world should change, than I should feel bad about my disability.

obviously Ive just removed a quote here, and I know it doesn't reflect your post on the whole but Id like to give some of my experiences on it. Generally, campaigning for changes such as this I feel is a good thing, disabled people must be able to access public spaces, and if they hadn't campaigned as hard as they did they would not have seen such changes such as ramps and accessible buses. Public spending and legislation on these issues is much cheaper in the long run if it enables more freedom. Most disabled people simply want a chance to work, and well designed public amenities can help them achieve this. The alternative is spending money on care and private transport and this is extremely costly. If we aren't prepared to spend it on that, then many of these people are genuinely helpless. Their pride campaign is generally an attempt to increase their own employability and standard of public access and I do not feel it is selfish for them to do that, rather it reflects a selfishness of architects and town planners for generally poor design which would have cost nothing to consider access. The disabled unfortunately had to do some pretty extreme protesting to get buses redesigned with wheelchair and buggy access, but on the whole, this saves the tax payer money in the long run.

With regards to disability rights and pride as mentioned in earlier posts, its a subject that can have positive and negative consequences for everybody concerned. I'm reminded of a woman I worked with who had a daughter who was wheelchair bound , learning disabled and deaf. She received funding for the wheelchair and special school, but no help for the girl being deaf, because deaf campaigners had succeeded in removing it from association with disability funding in her area ( at least that's generally how she worded it, I'm sure there must be some help available somewhere) She taught Makaton for free (disability sign language) because she was angry at having to pay for the course herself. A makaton course is not cheap either. So in this case it had a very negative outcome - Note how its the most needy that lose out.
Funding is sadly misused rather than over used. We had a man who spoke Makaton come to our autism service from elsewhere, but we were not trained in Makaton and subsequently we could not communicate with him effectively. He used to touch his ear a lot, and I learned from watching `Something Special` on Cbeebies he was actually asking for water.
That would represent a loss of invested skill running into many thousands of pounds.

Another story springs to mind , in that a woman with Spina Bifida whom I worked with was given a job putting washers on screws. She was wheelchair bound and could only move her hands, not even well enough to feed herself, but the job meant everything to her, she frequently expressed it as a source of pride that she was now in employment and her self-esteem was extremely fragile in that respect, she frequently referred to herself as a burden and would cry often about it. Life is truly retched for some people. However the job made her fingers bleed, and she was unable to go to the toilet on her own, she ended up wetting herself and hiding it, and then not drinking at all for the duration of the working day. She said she was afraid they would find out and take the job off her, but I do not feel its right for somebody to be so degraded, its just such a tragedy vast swathes of the population do not share this girls work ethic. Eventually she lost the job as it was deemed inappropriate. Im not sure what conclusions to draw from it, just that each time I think of her, im reminded that there are genuine cases out there, who, due to their disability, have developed a genuine desire to work, and work very hard.

Going back to a previous post about autism rights, and `Isms` ect as Im going a bit off subject! I used to be active in autism rights circles , having been diagnosed myself many years ago. The cap fits sadly, but I no longer wear it, having socialised sufficiently long enough to get by in society (I do blame my lateral drift through life on it though its easier than blaming myself ha!) Many people with autism are in the same boat in that they want to work but certain barriers are in the way. I feel autism campaigns and autism pride have gone to far, they allow people with a diagnosis to get all kinds of help and funding, but it is never the right kind of help. For instance, they are given free computers, extra time, more leniency, even skipping queues in theme parks, non of which will truly help them integrate and be functioning members of society which should be the goal. The reality is getting somebody with autism that level and involve being harsh with them, which is a big no-no in leftist thinking.
Ive worked with all the range of the spectrum from severe , non speaking non toilet using to people like myself who only briefly struggle, though my father is quite significantly aspergers, they have changed the DSM and everybody is now under the umberella term of autism. This is destructive - firstly if everybody with `autism` got preferencial treatment, it would bankrupt the country, secondly , those with Kanners Autism do not get the actual support they need. With Regards to pride , yes its a good thing in many ways, and I was pleased to find asperger friends and a social group, we would meet regularly , and it included a count down grand master and book authors, this is no coincidence, many people with autism do have sets of superior skills, unfortunately they easily develop the ability to become very self-centered and arrogant about it. The CountDown grand master was unbearable and down right rude. He accused us all of not making him welcome when he himself had sat at another table with his back to us and his laptop on! Luckily within such a group, there is no room for rightous indignation, and he was called for what he was - Ignorant and childish. Which unfortunatley if a member of the public, or a practitioner had called him such a thing they would have found themselves in hot water. In fact I love having a diagnosis just so I can lay into individuals of that ilk who make excuses that I know are fabricated.
That said, there is some very bad autism approaches and in cases like these , autism pride is needed, I am speaking of the Judge Rotten-Berg Centre in America, which, inexplicably , has been granted some kind of immunity to fit its students with electric shock packs and actually give them electric shocks severe enough to burn the skin. They can be tied up and given this treatment, and all students must wear these packs at all times. It has been shown repeatedly to be ineffective and I'm extremely uncomfortable with the idea that autistic children should have a different set of rights to normal children.
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Yessica » 02 Jun 2014, 16:28

Thanks for your thoughts, Elliott, Jonathan and Lindsey.

Lindsey, it is interesting you say you have been diagnosed with autism. I imagined people with autism to be different but I do not know much about the disease. Why have you been diagnosed?

I am all in favour of better access for everybody. To my mind stating that there is no such thing as a disability still couldn't be farer from the truth. You can write everything in Braille, but a blind person still cannot enjoy watching the sunset. Not the fact that other people like watching the sunset, talk about it and write books you do not understand about it is the problem. Your disability is.

... pride / Deaf pride / whatever often involves denying your children medical help (like cochlear implants in the case of the deaf) and opting for disabled designer babies.
The concept of helping the unfortunates gets perverted here. You demand your right to afflict your children with your condition because it is no disease, in the next step you demand the public to fund the special needs of the disabled designer babies you created or the children who are only disabled because you denied them medical help. What is worse: You are taking away every choice away from your children. If I was born hearing and seeing and at 18 come to the conclusion that being deaf and blind is better I still can destroy my eyesight and hearing but it is not possible the other way around.

Lindsey wrote:I am speaking of the Judge Rotten-Berg Centre in America, which, inexplicably , has been granted some kind of immunity to fit its students with electric shock packs and actually give them electric shocks severe enough to burn the skin. They can be tied up and given this treatment, and all students must wear these packs at all times. It has been shown repeatedly to be ineffective and I'm extremely uncomfortable with the idea that autistic children should have a different set of rights to normal children.


I am not sure if I understand you. Why do you think autistic pride is necessary? Isn't that kind of treatment oposed to the human rights which apply to all kinds of people?
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Lindsey » 02 Jun 2014, 18:01

When we talk about pride, what we are generally talking about is people's right to be themselves without having to feel inferior (yes the word right is a can of worms in itself!). Often kids with autism are bullied for having poor coordination but go on to make excellent computer scientists, and I think this kind of pride in ones own hard work and abilities is fine. I agree with you about deaf pride though, deciding your child is going to be deaf is failing at the most fundamental level of parenting - that of deliberately taking away personal choice to suit the parents satisfaction. you are free to leave a religion if you chose so as an adult , but you are not free to leave the deaf community is your parents refused you cochlear implants in the vital first four years.
Where activists groups work is when they campaign for much needed change, as without them, problems go unhighlighted. Where they fail is when they demand too much and actually become problematic.
This in an article on the judge rottenberg centre http://m.motherjones.com/politics/2007/08/school-shock
Indeed children in the school have less human rights than the most evil kinds of prisoners! And it's widely known about in autistic circles due to autism awareness groups.
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Lindsey » 02 Jun 2014, 20:50

I forgot to mention with the autism pride - most people with autism who are successful in their fields are successful because of their autism and not inspite of it, this is contrary to other disabilities. If we created a gene selection science which could highlight and eliminate genes thought responsible for autism it would very likely have negative consequences , for instance engineers are four times more likely to have autistic children, we would literally be eliminating a generic profile that is favourable to engineering . The same cannot be said for deafness and blindness. This is the gripe with people diagnosed with autism , that school often stifles them as it used to be viewed purely as a disability. The flip side of the coin is that many people with aspergers will be utter failures in life and because of the positive slant on autism , they will never seek to improve their weaker areas because "it's because I have autism" becomes their mantra.
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Yessica » 03 Jun 2014, 06:11

Lindsey wrote:When we talk about pride, what we are generally talking about is people's right to be themselves without having to feel inferior (yes the word right is a can of worms in itself!).


I understand that a person with autism says that he has special abilities and is only different. I cannot understand how having two legs is not better than having zero legs - just to pick an example. It does not give you any advantage I can see.
Of course you have all the right in the world to feel being unable to walk makes you a special person... but why? Why let it define you? Why not be proud of your other abilities instead and strenghten them?

To my mind the money spend on disability pride parades was far much better spend on research on new prostheses, better working equipment in high risk jobs (to prevent disabilities from happen) and better safety drills in the workplace and for new drivers.

Re: school. I do not think I fully understand why people with aspergers do not flourish in the structured environment of a school? I think I do not understand aspergers well enough. Could you explain?
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Lindsey » 03 Jun 2014, 08:12

Yes I agree with you! Pride for the sake of it is pointless . most people I've met with disabilities just want to get on with life. I'm reminded of a programe about people living with facial deformity and disfigurement. The shows host, a woman with a genetic syndrome causing excessive facial bone growth was arguing for acceptance which was perfectly fine until she visited a plastic surgeon who specialised in facial reconstruction. She made her animosity clear, feeling he contributed to the image that facial disfigurement was unacceptable, but what she failed to understand is that first of all, choice is good, and secondly, few people wish to be a martyr for their disability, they would rather not have it, and that's not a 'lack of self acceptance' as she felt, it's just normal to want to fit in.
With regards to aspergers, they generally do cope well in structured environments, but they don't cope well with socialising. One of my own problems as a child was that the classroom was unbearably noisy, I still have difficulty now picking out one voice in a crowded room, but at school I would curl up in a ball in the corner because the noise to me was extreme and confusing. I can only imagine its even worse for them now, being that classes are even more noisy and chaotic. As many as 1 in 10 children with autism are pitch perfect, which is ten times higher than the normal population.
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Yessica » 31 Oct 2014, 09:49

I have heard some of the most bizarre accusations of racism when it come to ebola:

* "not helping is racist" (well I kinda agree with not helping is not very nice but there is no proof that it is racist)
* "helping the countries affected by ebola is racist because it is patronizing"
* "being afraid of ebola is racist"
* "It is racist that Thomas Eric Duncan who brought ebola to the USA died. He was let die on purpose"
* "border controlls for ebola are racist"
* "quarantining medical personal who has been to fight ebola (and is mostly white by the way) is racist"
* "not being interested in ebola is racist"

I assume soon everything other than having ebola yourself will be considered racist.
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Re: Most bizarre accusations of racism, sexism or another -ism

Postby Elliott » 11 Nov 2014, 03:55

Even having ebola yourself could be considered racist. You're stealing the black man's disease. You're co-opting his culture.
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