Probably the only tattooist on here...

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This is a new section and up until a "reshuffle" in January 2013 users told a little about themselves in context in posts (often in their first posts), or above as they told how they heard of Dalrymple. Now though, if you would like to say a little more please feel free to start a thread with any title you like.

Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Lindsey » 27 Sep 2013, 07:42

Greetings! I've lurked these boards for quite sometime and have been an admirer of dalrymples work for much longer. I felt its time I stopped hiding and joined in, however I was initially worried Id be throwing myself to the lions given my background as a working class Manchester tattooist (yes I'll be joining in the fun later!) however, I must say , everybody here is so polite and accommodating its a breath of fresh air and I'm sure we will get on fine. I will write more when I'm not on my disappointingly slow old phone.
Lindsey
 
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Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Elliott » 27 Sep 2013, 14:20

A tattooist?! I must admit, after everything we've said about tattoos you're probably the last person I expected to join this forum! (Other than a black Muslim feminist.) I for one will try to be polite about your trade, but you'll never get me to believe that tattoos look good! :)
Elliott
 
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Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Lindsey » 27 Sep 2013, 15:17

It's ok I'm not here to convert anybody! Ok I just have to tattoo some rosary beads on a pair of lesbians while their baby screams and I'll be right back.
Honestly wish I was kidding
Lindsey
 
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Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Gavin » 27 Sep 2013, 15:35

I would be interested to know what you like about Dalrymple's writing.
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Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Lindsey » 27 Sep 2013, 18:07

I’ve not been tattooing very long in all honesty, before this I worked several years in the care industry for adults with autism and learning difficulties, and it is perhaps that more than anything that soured my liberal outlook, although I find it hard to describe myself as either left or right, I have a very mixed bag of both ideologies, and I’m not sure there can be truly be a line drawn down the middle.
I began with a very avid passion for the arts . I began to paint and exhibit work from an early age, and I set about learning old master oil techniques, reading what I could find on the subject and putting it into practice. I took art at college and much to my shock, I was told that what I did was not art, and unless I changed to producing modern art, I would not receive good grades. I did not change and I received an F for my work in realism by women in purple flowing scarves who would give entire lectures on how realism art was fuelled by paedophilia, oppression of women and homosexuality (it’s a slur when they want it to be) It had a profound effect on me, I was in fact insulted several times directly by art teachers and left in tears, which would please them when my work would be graded. I went on to distain the arts, the art world and everybody associated with it. I simply wanted to paint and was not expecting a backlash for my most innocent of hobbies. From that I went on to study scientific illustration, where actually having talent was valued and hard work was rewarded, and for the first time in my life, I was among middle class people who I find I intellectually have more in common with. However we never escaped the sneering from modern art students that we were `mere illustrators` and in hiding behind this liberal art agenda, they could congratulate themselves on being superior to those that showed genuine talent. In fact several times I heard the art tutors refer to themselves and their students as “creative genius” in a world where people get to be called a genius for barely lifting a finger, it’s little wonder so many of them took to it like a duck to water.
After college, and several years as the stereotypical ‘starving artist’ I did two things that changed my life – firstly I switched to my career in health care, and secondly I put my hobby of bushcraft into action and joined a bushcraft community. This has done much to shape my values. The community I joined is a very mixed social bag unified by a desire to learn and recreate skills and traditions long forgotten. There is members of the aristocracy , homeless people, gypsies and rather a startling amount of mental health workers and IT workers all hiding in the woods away from society. It has been so important for me to find this community; I feel I can refer to them as family. We don’t always live in the woods of course, only on organised occasions, but in doing so, when a community comes together in such a way, even for a brief few days, you begin to see a stark contrast in how life used to be live to how it is now. For example the community has strong male role models, which many of the children latch onto hungrily. The focus is on adult society not pandering to children, and with a group living in a small area, group thinking, empathy, courtesy, manners, good deeds and less selfishness begin to flourish. If you take more than you give in such a small society, if you enjoy the fire without chopping the wood, if you eat the food without contributing, it will be mentally noted by all who witness. A person’s subconscious status within the minds of others is for a large part based on what they contribute. So our main agenda in the bushcraft group is the learning and teaching of traditional skills. We have many scout leaders attend to pass on knowledge to scouts, and many teachers. Some members also run bushcraft schools or hire out for events.
And so attending these events has allowed my interests to flourish – art, tool making, survival, folklore, botany, craftwork, and history among others. In my spare time I learn avidly, I’m currently learning aspects of chemistry and physics, making a Viking drinking horn, making medieval oak gall ink and clothing dyes and taxidermy. As you can imagine, I don’t very well fit in many places.
On to Healthcare, I think the attitude that “their behaviour is not their fault” did the most disservice to the individuals it is applied to more than anything I can think of. People who could have been managed to the point of integration into society became demanding, violent, adult toddlers who saw no negative comeback to their behaviour, only dewy –eyed social workers offering them more chocolate, more reward for bad behaviour. If you pointed out that we were actively making people violent by failing to reprimand their behaviour, you’d be met with the mantra “they behave this way because of their autism…” Strangely the people in question could control their violence with regards to not inflicting it on other service users who might hit them back…it was reserved only for staff, and smaller staff at that. And there in lay the failure to actually utilise the self restraint skills a person may have that would allow them into society. Instead I came to believe the charity was self-serving. It had no interest in the wellbeing or the self development of the people it claimed to serve. In fact if we did such things, we would have nobody to look after and keep us in employment! Not everybody can be helped of course, and I more than many understand and sympathised with the people in the service, I felt it was a tragedy they got so little genuine help. So after several years of increased dismay (and I could write reams on the subject) I begun focusing my interests back to my hobbies. For a while I became interested in pyrography, and begun to create burned portraits in leather, which in turn piqued my interest in tattooing, which shortly after I begun, I found myself very much in demand. Being that most tattooists can’t actually draw, it is no surprise.
I forget where I came across Dalrymples work, I think it was in response to The End of Faith by Sam Harris. I have enjoyed reading much of the work, and if I can sum up where it is I resonate, It is because I believe in what I would call `True adulthood` That is - self responsibility, hard work, and in self awareness and personal development. I try to Learn and pass on skills, I make active decisions to swear less, be more polite, more accommodating, more self suffient. I’m not very good at summing things up in words, and I find it hard personally to say what society lacks, but for me it is lacking, and while I enjoy my job, and most of the people I meet I despair at some, and god knows where they find the money to get tattoos and alcohol. I’m surprised to find myself in the profession, but if you will sympathise with me for a moment, these people treated me much kinder than the so-called art industry! I guess Im going to get flak from all sides for tattooing, but Im far happier than I was in healthcare. and Im happy to answer questions. I see now realism is returning to our galleries, and traditional skills are being valued once more, I may well return to painting, and perhaps I will begin to teach it once I have mastered it to the level I am happy with. Sorry this turned into such an essay, but how one arrives at certain viewpoints in life can be very complicated! Also, I apologise, I put my name in capitals, I didn't notice until afterwards, its probably too late to change it. (and no I've never tattooed a spelling mistake!)
Lindsey
 
Posts: 75
Joined: 27 Sep 2013, 07:29

Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Yessica » 27 Sep 2013, 21:19

What an interesting introduction and an interesting life story.

I would love to hear how you made that viking horn one day. I am somewhat interested in staging history and think such an horn would be just cool and might proof useful one day.

I have a question. Why do you think that the things you adore in your bushcraft community are or could not be existant in other communities? Why for example do you think there cannot be strong male role models or manners in the city?
Yessica
 
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Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Nathan » 27 Sep 2013, 21:22

Lindsey - what a fascinating and well-rounded life history you've had!

Personally my views on tattoos and piercings are that I find them unsightly and can't think why anybody in their right mind would essentially want to mutilate their body in that way, and I see it as symptomatic of something negative, but each to their own. I haven't had nearly as much first-hand, close-up experience of the underclass as you seem to have had so I don't feel qualified to comment.

You mentioned working in the healthcare industry and seeing people who have been infantilised and whose behaviour excused over the years has soured your liberal outlook - I can well understand that, but you mention dewy-eyed social workers who couldn't see what you could see. Such as with left-wing teachers and white liberals choosing to live in ethnic ghettos, what do you think blinds these people to the damage that being well meaning can do?
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Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Lindsey » 27 Sep 2013, 22:37

Yessica, I'd love to hear more about your interest in staged historical events, a few times I did a Viking re-enactment and thoroughly enjoyed it. I believe the qualities I see in the community I'm a part of probably exist in many places but in a small microcosm it's much easy to see and become aware of. I'm having trouble finishing the horn, I have a habit of leaving what I'm working on for several weeks at a time.
Lindsey
 
Posts: 75
Joined: 27 Sep 2013, 07:29

Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Lindsey » 27 Sep 2013, 22:47

Nathan I suspect for many health workers the reason they don't see the damage is because they were never truly understood any particular individual in the first place, or Pahaps they saw the diagnosis and not the individuals capacity . My ex boyfriend was diagnosed aspergers as a child, one of the first in the country in the early eighties. So by today's asperger diagnosis standards, he would be labelled fully autistic. He was given a place in a special school after being expelled from nursery, however his mother resolutely refused to give him anything other than a proper education and tolerated none of his bad behaviour. He is now a learning disability nurse and autism consultant in London , throughout our work with adults with autism, he always took the most hard line view of bad behaviour , being quite able to tell if a patient was genuinely in distress or not. , and I think what health care professionals perhaps also lack is te inability to see the long term consequences of their infantilising behaviour, where as my ex-partner could see quite clearly the disservice it would do the person not to control the extremities of their behaviour. We split up when our jobs moved us too far apart and we remain good friends.
Lindsey
 
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Joined: 27 Sep 2013, 07:29

Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Yessica » 30 Sep 2013, 16:39

Lindsey,

friends of mine are "(late) middle-age people" and staging history. I just went along a few times.
I "gave the impression" of a peasant. I like to sew and made my own dress and also shoes from a piece of leather. I already have a horn, which I bought when I went to a middle age fair. I think I already mentioned that fair (and how I noticed nobody there belonged to a minority) on this boards. Still I would love to have a horn I made myself.
I also like RPGs and a horn would be handy there.

I love how some people really put themselves into staging history, for example there was a real medival black-smith at one of the events. Watching him was so much fun. I also love the perfect costumes some people have.

Personally I am "a soft one". I do not sleep at the scene but always at hotels, but I love the hard-core reenactors.

I would love to reenact early middle age (for example a Viking reenactment like you did) or also other times such as the industrialization. Does anybody ever reenact that time? Never heard of it.

I hope to have the opportunity to do some more reenactment soon. Just the day before you wrote your post I have been reading a blog about it. My only problem now is that I have a child and I do not know if it was a good idea to take him there.
Yessica
 
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Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Paul » 30 Sep 2013, 23:56

Great life story Lindsey.

I like tinkering and working with my hands and the sort of craft work you are doing is, I am sure, very rewarding. I can also see how you probably get satisfaction from the tattooing also. And well - we all have to earn a living. Everyone here anyway.

I'm just a little bit interested in old weaponry - for the historical value of course - and the aesthetics. Have you seen the Frenchman on Youtube? It's a 52 minute video but this is a craftsman beyond compare.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IrdrpyAuJfI


I have a friend in Wales who took up pyrography just a few years ago, as a hobby. He's an electrician by trade and works for one of the Welsh supply companies (SWALEC), often working with up to 132,000 volt National Grid main lines. He should change his job!

His pyro' work is truly stunning. Absolutely beautiful. He works exclusively on wood and does a lot of Celtic knotwork patterning, interweaved with animals of a Celtic or Brittanic nature (wolf, cattle, otter, even mice) and insect life too. One piece of work incorporating a dozen bees is breath-taking. He keeps 'thinking' of selling his work around the web, but never seems to get round to it and just does pieces for friends - for nothing or just a drink!

It's a very fine art. The horn-making sounds good too.

Yessica: I made a small coal forge early this year and have since expanded it somewhat. What enormous fun it is as you noted. Better fun to do it than just to watch!

I've forged some rams' heads, some bulls' heads and I'm currently wrestling with a couple of dragons' heads. These have been the handle end of fire pokers and of wall hooks. I've forged some medieval-style wrought-iron crosses (crucifixes) and ........... a few English bodkin-pointed arrow heads! I'm also currently beating out an iron shield, which has taken good shape but I continually want to do more detail to it. That's been on the go since about May.

I'll have to ask Gavin - am I allowed to put a few pictures on here, from my hard drive only, as attachments?
Paul
 
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Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Gavin » 01 Oct 2013, 00:22

Of course, Paul - can you attach them okay? If so, go ahead.
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Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Lindsey » 01 Oct 2013, 19:50

what a wonderful link Paul! his skills are amazing! Ive had commissions a few times to pyrograph sheaths for knife makers, sadly the knife and sword making industry in this country took a blow when Ebay bowed to pressure to ban knife sales. This prevented uk knife makers also selling abroad to, although ebay in other countries still permits knife sales, UK makers are now at a disadvantage, and I know of two personally who had to discontinue the profession. Its not really as though criminals are going to spend £300 on a knife to stab somebody with either, nor really even buy any knife off ebay with which they intend to cause damage with, as the paper trail is rather too easy to follow!
Id love to see some of your Iron work Paul. I have a friend named Dave Budd, who might actually be the man you talked about Yessica - He travels from show to show doing Medieval/dark ages forging. He is a very small, dark haired man. He also runs courses on traditional knife and tool forging, I'm not sure if he makes swords or not, but I know he spent considerable time researching and resurrecting this old British Techniques.
If you dont mind me posting pictures either, This is the kind of pyrography I used to do :http://smg.photobucket.com/user/firecrest22/media/sanwomanpyro.jpg.html
http://smg.photobucket.com/user/firecre ... 2.jpg.html
Work like this would take me about a week to do, sadly its difficult to sell any kind of art or craft for a sum of money that reflects the amount of time gone into it. I can earn more in one hour of tattooing what I could not make on any piece of original art, and 2 days tattooing represents one month of my old wage in health care. Its a crazy world!
Lindsey
 
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Joined: 27 Sep 2013, 07:29

Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Paul » 02 Oct 2013, 00:43

Yes crazy. It would currently take me about 3 hours to beat out a scrolled crucifix which may sell for £20. Minimum wage then, or less. Simpler crosses can be achieved far quicker however.

It's a fabulous video indeed if you like this kind of thing, Check out his Viking Sword videos (parts 1 & 2, each about 25 mins) if you do. If anything, this piece is the more skillful and incorporates more forging techniques.

Interesting what you say about the UK knife situation, but a touchy business, that of weaponry. As the Duke of Edinburgh once said though - "do we ban cricket bats and motor cars because they have both been used to kill people?", or words similar to those. I'm all for less government and less law-making rather than more law-making, but then I wouldn't agree to permit people to walk into a pharmacy and buy cyanide, nor possess nitro-glycerine.

You mentioned a chemistry interest. Hve you investigated the chemistry of metals, specifically steels and steel treatments yet? I put someone onto the basics and left them to it, just last week. They were then amazed somewhat and suddenly appreciated there's a whole lot of science in this metal business. It's not just sparks and loud noises.

Thanks Gavin. I think I should manage ok. I shall start a separate thread shortly.
Paul
 
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Re: Probably the only tattooist on here...

Postby Yessica » 23 Dec 2013, 20:14

It is seems to be only commercial reenacting, but I think this sounds nice: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... useum.html

May be I will go there one day.

Merry Christmas!
Yessica
 
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