Some metalwork and crafting

Please feel free to introduce yourself
About this forum
This is a new section and up until a "reshuffle" in January 2013 users told a little about themselves in context in posts (often in their first posts), or above as they told how they heard of Dalrymple. Now though, if you would like to say a little more please feel free to start a thread with any title you like.

Re: Some metalwork and crafting

Postby Paul » 17 Nov 2013, 03:18

Some machine tools from a glorious era of British engineering. All powered by three-phase 415 volt electrical supply.
Attachments
Drill.JPG
Progress drilling machine with auto-feed. A frightening device quite frankly, when it's drilling 1 inch holes in steel plate. I often go and hide and let it get on with things!
Milling Machine.JPG
Arno Milling machine. Italian manufacture, early 1960s. Runs like a Swiss watch.
Holbrook.jpg
Holbrook centre lathe, my favourite toy. Came from the Royal Ordanance factory at Eccles, Manchester in 1989. Manufactured early 1953 and featured in a cold war! Weighs approximately 40lbs shy of 2 tons.
Paul
 
Posts: 512
Joined: 02 Aug 2011, 11:37
Location: Lancashire, England.

Re: Some metalwork and crafting

Postby Lindsey » 17 Nov 2013, 09:27

What beautiful work paul! I'd love to learn metal work, is this your job or hobby?
Lindsey
 
Posts: 75
Joined: 27 Sep 2013, 07:29

Re: Some metalwork and crafting

Postby Paul » 17 Nov 2013, 11:27

Thanks Lindsey.

I'm a metal-worker by trade, though predominantly a welder and fabricator in the modern sense. I will do other stuff as the need arises, such as woodworking (I love woodwork) and other handcrafting. I've done quite a lot of vehicle bodywork in the past, particularly classic car work. The late 1980s and early 90s was a hey-day for this kind of thing and I worked on some beautiful old vehicles. It also honed a lot of skill and instilled a love of detail.

This hot forgework is something I've only been doing for about 6 months after years of saying I will gather a bit more kit and have a go. I didn't start from zero knowledge of course, which has helped me. I've had the anvil since 1986 and it is worn (they nearly all are) as you may see. So I have used it for all those years but not for much hot work and so only occasionally. I paid £100 for it at the time, to a farmer in Wales and had to carry it (two of us) about 100 yards. Of course I was much younger back then.

I can do loads of stuff with a modern welding machine and machined parts which may look more perfect, but from the point of view of 'hand' crafting alone, it's kind of 'cheating'. It's not really of course, but work like the above with just hand tools, no electrics or machines, is obviously seen as more rustic and traditional and there is an increasing appreciation of it. I would like to go further into it but I'm not up to speed at all yet. I've sold a few things so far which has paid for all my fuel used (Welsh anthracite) and put some food on the table. It's like learning a new skill altogether which takes time. It's all in doing it, not talking about it or reading too much, although YouTube is remarkably informative. Nothing like watching an old boy actually do it. But there are never enough hours in a day!

I find it very therapeutic also and really pleasing when it comes together. So yes, it's like a half-hobby so far but one I would like to take further. Current economic and social events are a worry however. The price of steel bars has more or less tripled since about 2001, whereas prior to that steel was quite cheap and subject to minor inflationary rises of about 1% per annum, traditionally on January 1st. Once upon a time I could predict and quote prices of steel from one 6 months to the next. These days I never have a clue and have to carefully check by telephone before I can commit myself.

As regards copper, brass , stainless steel, etc - it's like dealing with precious metals now. In fact they are precious.

Did anyone know that Paul Weston used to be a welder, including the underwater deep-sea variety, which is obviously a supreme skill? I was all the more impressed with him when I discovered that. I bet he earned some good money there.
Paul
 
Posts: 512
Joined: 02 Aug 2011, 11:37
Location: Lancashire, England.

Re: Some metalwork and crafting

Postby Gavin » 17 Nov 2013, 12:43

You're a real artisan, Paul - admirable stuff!

Did anyone know that Paul Weston used to be a welder, including the underwater deep-sea variety, which is obviously a supreme skill? I was all the more impressed with him when I discovered that. I bet he earned some good money there.


I did not know that about him at all. Where did you learn that?
Gavin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3430
Joined: 27 Jul 2011, 18:13
Location: Once Great Britain

Re: Some metalwork and crafting

Postby Paul » 17 Nov 2013, 22:01

Thanks again Gavin

I'm not exactly sure where I learned about Paul Weston welding underwater but it would be this year, just a few months ago . It was probably around the time Mr Weston did the 'I am a racist' video on the banks of the Thames. He was also highlighted again on this forum at the time, naturally.

I then did a little bit of catching up as to where Mr Weston was up to re Liberty GB and the various other things he's done and including his contributions on the GOV site. In fact I went to GOV the other day and clicked on his archive of articles there and read two or three of the most recent that I hadn't read before. There's still one there, his latest, that I have yet to read. I do the same with TD articles although this is now much easier because of the excellent 'Skeptical Doctor' e-mail feeds. Once upon a time, before SD and this forum, I used to check almost daily for TD articles (City Journal, etc) that I hadn't read.

So it's probably on the Liberty GB website or from a linked comment from there. Maybe I should have linked it here at the time, sorry.

I shall have a look about again and try to find it.

Sorry to PW if he's reading this. We aren't prying, we're just interested.
Paul
 
Posts: 512
Joined: 02 Aug 2011, 11:37
Location: Lancashire, England.

Re: Some metalwork and crafting

Postby Paul » 17 Nov 2013, 22:08

Here you go Gavin.

Trained as a pilot too. Certainly no chump then and a little more skilled and experienced than many a person in Britain we might mention. The Prime Minister for one....!

http://libertygb.org.uk/v1/index.php/ho ... aul-weston
Paul
 
Posts: 512
Joined: 02 Aug 2011, 11:37
Location: Lancashire, England.

Re: Some metalwork and crafting

Postby Paul » 17 Nov 2013, 22:24

A recent article on Paul Weston's own blog too, just yesterday in fact and about the very thing we've been posting about

http://paulweston101.blogspot.co.at/

Sorry about clogging up my own thread - but I don't mind. We're both Pauls and we're both welders.
Paul
 
Posts: 512
Joined: 02 Aug 2011, 11:37
Location: Lancashire, England.

Re: Some metalwork and crafting

Postby Gavin » 17 Nov 2013, 23:15

He's a very interesting person, isn't he? I hadn't seen that profile prior to meeting him and the time flew by when we did meet, last August. I was hoping he was going to come on this forum and make some comment - we'll see.
Gavin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3430
Joined: 27 Jul 2011, 18:13
Location: Once Great Britain

Re: Some metalwork and crafting

Postby Paul » 18 Nov 2013, 00:29

Yes Gavin, he certainly is. And yet by his own admission on that profile, not an academic success and seemingly didn't exactly gel at school. It just goes to show then.......

Of course, the reverse would be a better situation for most people.

These days, that might be even more the case, in fact I'm certain of it. Go to university and get a good degree .......... to end up stacking shelves in Tesco! I suppose PW has done a good deal of his employment outside Britain. In fact he says so.

Anyway, I like the fact that it highlights that not everyone of manual-worker status nor (maybe for PW) working-class status is a lefty and a traitor. One might think of Tommy Robinson as well. It's to be hoped that ALL workers (as opposed to the idle, the scroungers and the incompetent) move more steadily to the right. They are the ones paying for all this madness, no matter their job or class. I think people are waking up, and the hard-working foremost among them.

The self-employed in my experience (and there are many) have always been to the right, at least economically and to a great degree socially, which is pretty obvious really. Or it ought to be. We don't want to be taxed dispropotionately, so as to pay scroungers and immigrants and we want firm law and order, a lack of pettifogging regulations and far, far less nanny state.

It's all socialism that has sucked in the working class (and then abandoned them in favour of even poorer foreign people). All the vile bedfellows of socialism as well, such as feminism, victimology, infantilisation, idleness and an expectant attitude. Gosh I get so stressed about it!
Paul
 
Posts: 512
Joined: 02 Aug 2011, 11:37
Location: Lancashire, England.

Re: Some metalwork and crafting

Postby Jonathan » 21 Nov 2013, 16:00

Very impressive work, Paul, and it was also nice to see the equipment you use. Not that I'm at all knowledgeable on the subject - the only metalworking I've done is a bit of lathework back in school.

I have dabbled in woodworking, though - mostly fixing and refinishing old furniture. One day I'll make a proper hobby of it.
Jonathan
 
Posts: 407
Joined: 03 Aug 2011, 05:14
Location: Israel

Re: Some metalwork and crafting

Postby Paul » 23 Nov 2013, 22:42

Thanks Jonathan

Woodwork I really like. After playing with metal, wood feels so much easier to work with and the results are maybe more quickly apparent. Though of course, it's no way half as easy to do quality work as anything might seem.

For years I've been promising myself to make some high-quality bookcases, to go together as one unit to occupy a large wall. Something grand and befitting of what could then be a library room. Alas so far. Really good quality timber is increasingly hard to come by.

I've got the books though, hundreds of them that are beginning to spill over into piles here and there. It's a start!
Paul
 
Posts: 512
Joined: 02 Aug 2011, 11:37
Location: Lancashire, England.

Re: Some metalwork and crafting

Postby Paul » 04 Feb 2014, 09:08

Something to cheer Yessica up I would hope.

German blacksmith, 83 years old and still tapping away on his anvil.

Paul
 
Posts: 512
Joined: 02 Aug 2011, 11:37
Location: Lancashire, England.

Previous

Return to Introductions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron

User Menu

Login Form

This site costs £100 per year to run and makes no money.

If you would like to make a small contribution to help pay for the web hosting, you can do so here.

Who is online

In total there is 1 user online :: 0 registered, 0 hidden and 1 guest (based on users active over the past 5 minutes)
Most users ever online was 175 on 12 Jan 2015, 18:23

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest
Copyright © Western Defence. All Rights Reserved.