Little announcement

Please feel free to introduce yourself
About this forum
This is a new section and up until a "reshuffle" in January 2013 users told a little about themselves in context in posts (often in their first posts), or above as they told how they heard of Dalrymple. Now though, if you would like to say a little more please feel free to start a thread with any title you like.

Re: Little announcement

Postby Yessica » 21 Nov 2014, 10:47

Yessica wrote:Thanks, Paul :)


You know how I feel? Not only childbirth is scary but being a parent can be also scary. While in the hospital I watched the covering of the armicstice day and the daily mail had so much about the poppies in the last days. I have not looked into it today. Is there still another story today?

May God give our son will have a long and happy live and not die early like those young men.
Yessica
 
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Re: Little announcement

Postby Nathan » 21 Nov 2014, 14:14

Congratulations, Yessica!

What did you call your new son? I like traditional German names and think it's a shame when I meet so many Germans nowadays with the same first names as I would see over here, so I hope he is a Thorsten or a Dieter or something :)
Nathan
 
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Re: Little announcement

Postby Gavin » 21 Nov 2014, 14:21

Yes, big congratulations on that, Yessica! I've also asked Yessica what she's named her boy and would be interested to learn if it's a traditional German name.

It's a such a shame the countries of Germany and England "fell out" (to put it mildly) as I believe we have a lot in common and there is much to admire about German culture, history and industry. I have little doubt Europeans will pull together in the coming years, but respecting each other's nation states and not in the shape of the EU.
Gavin
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Re: Little announcement

Postby Elliott » 21 Nov 2014, 18:03

Congratulations, Yessica. I'm always glad to hear of a new little European, especially a German or a Brit!
Elliott
 
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Re: Little announcement

Postby Yessica » 28 Nov 2014, 21:24

We chose several first names and the first first name ("Rufname", how do you say that?) will be slavic in origin. It is actually the rare shortform of a longer slavic name and we chose it because it runs in my husbands family... and only in my husbands family.
We think it is nice his family has this unique name and thats why we chose it as part of a family tradition.

[...]and think it's a shame when I meet so many Germans nowadays with the same first names as I would see over here


As someone from Eastern Germany I am somewhat ashamed of the faux English names (often misspelled) many of us have and I always wondered how the real English felt about that. There is a reason for this. Some parents in the GDR used english names to voice mild disapproval of the government or the wish for another life. English names used to be a code for "I wish for something different for my child"... only that Eastern Germans had little exposure the real English, no idea how a name was really spelled and called their son "Maik", "Meik" or "Mijk" when they wanted to call him "Mike".

Traditional German names are very rare nowadays. Most people I know chose "biblical names" like Ben or Elias or names that derive from Latin or Greek like Felix or Alexander.
I would say that many people chosing some traditional German names such as Thore or Siegfried do have a "ideological motivation" (meaning that they are not only patriotic but right-wing fanatics and typically also lower class).

The most common name for German of all generations is Christian "Thomas" by the way. At least that is what I heard on TV. It is a tradional German name, but could be English as well, couldn't it?
Yessica
 
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Re: Little announcement

Postby Yessica » 28 Nov 2014, 21:32

Gavin wrote:Yes, big congratulations on that, Yessica! I've also asked Yessica what she's named her boy and would be interested to learn if it's a traditional German name.

It's a such a shame the countries of Germany and England "fell out" (to put it mildly) as I believe we have a lot in common and there is much to admire about German culture, history and industry. I have little doubt Europeans will pull together in the coming years, but respecting each other's nation states and not in the shape of the EU.


Thanks a lot, Gavin!

I am not afraid of a war with England and hope neither are you... but of a clash of cultures and a war with the muslim world... but who knows only time will tell and I hope I am wrong.
Yessica
 
Posts: 426
Joined: 22 Mar 2013, 17:11

Re: Little announcement

Postby Nathan » 28 Nov 2014, 23:13

Yessica wrote:We chose several first names and the first first name ("Rufname", how do you say that?) will be slavic in origin. It is actually the rare shortform of a longer slavic name and we chose it because it runs in my husbands family... and only in my husbands family.


You've got me guessing what that could be! But I guess I'll never know...

Oh, and we don't have a distinction between Rufname and Vorname in English, so just 'first name' would do.

Yessica wrote:As someone from Eastern Germany I am somewhat ashamed of the faux English names (often misspelled) many of us have and I always wondered how the real English felt about that. There is a reason for this. Some parents in the GDR used english names to voice mild disapproval of the government or the wish for another life. English names used to be a code for "I wish for something different for my child"... only that Eastern Germans had little exposure the real English, no idea how a name was really spelled and called their son "Maik", "Meik" or "Mijk" when they wanted to call him "Mike".


I've never really thought about it before, but given people were using names to make a political statement I'm surprised the GDR didn't have a list of acceptable baby names like a lot of other countries did or still do. It would be a step too far in my opinion here, but at least it would stop some of the awful alternate spellings of names you see nowadays.

"Maik", ugh! How many times in his life would he have to tell people how to write his name and deal with all the funny looks?!

Yessica wrote:Traditional German names are very rare nowadays. Most people I know chose "biblical names" like Ben or Elias or names that derive from Latin or Greek like Felix or Alexander.
I would say that many people chosing some traditional German names such as Thore or Siegfried do have a "ideological motivation" (meaning that they are not only patriotic but right-wing fanatics and typically also lower class).

The most common name for German of all generations is Christian "Thomas" by the way. At least that is what I heard on TV. It is a tradional German name, but could be English as well, couldn't it?


Some of the Wagnerian-sounding names just sound a little bombastic to me. "Siegfried" in particular sounds silly because I can't stop thinking about what the parts mean in English. Imagine being meek and timid and having to live up to the name "Victorypeace"! I went to school with somebody a bit like that who was called Max Tyson (born before anybody had heard of Mike Tyson), and the name just didn't sound right for him at all.

Still, I do like German names like Dieter and Carsten, and Sabine and Ursula for women. You won't meet many of those here.

I've tried before to find out which is the most common first name here across all generations, and it seems you can only get the data per year of birth. Still, Thomas will be very high up the list, if not first. I wouldn't know what to guess for the most popular female name, because there seems to be more variety in girls' names and they have changed more over time.
Nathan
 
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Re: Little announcement

Postby Yessica » 09 Dec 2014, 08:13

Why didn't they have a list like that? Great question!

The FRG does not allow you to call your child any name and we do not even live in a authoritharian regime.

May be because they wanted to give the impression that this was a democratic country. There were also "votes", though 99% "voted" for the socialist SED. There were oppositional parties.

There were the Christian churches. I do not understand why they did not outlaw membership in an opposition party or church membership but I think it is because they wanted to give the people the impression they were free all while spying on the ones who for example were church members or gave their children American names.
The people of course never believed they were free, but some were testing "how far can I do, before I feel their iron fist".

But really I don't know. It's just what I think.

An unusual spelled English name is actually fine in Eastern Germany, but many have problems if the move to West Germany were those kind of names are only common in the underclass.

Are traditional (non Christian) English first names still common in England?
Yessica
 
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