Contemporary popular music

Discussing art and media trends and organisations generally

Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Gavin » 28 Apr 2013, 08:59

Billy Bragg's "speech" reminded me of Jonathan Aitken's!

I actually saw Billy live years ago. I like some of his songs - "Waiting for the Great Leap Forwards", "Sexuality". Luckily I had grown up, so knew that socialism couldn't work, before I paid much attention to the lyrics.
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Elliott » 28 Apr 2013, 09:11

I've always liked his song The Milkman of Human Kindness.

I seem to really have it in for BBC6 today. They just posted another status update. In this one they referred to their presenter (and ex Britpop songstress) Cerys Matthews as "Cery's". I asked them if they were sure Cerys should have an apostrophe. Odds are I'll get blocked from commenting on their stuff now!
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Gavin » 28 Apr 2013, 09:20

ex Britpop songstress) Cerys Matthews


She of Catatonia! You are really bringing back memories of the kind of music they used to make before all that hip hop rubbish became so dominant!

Hang on, I suppose it's racist to say you don't like hip-hop. That must be why the BBC plays so much of it. Hmm...
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Charlie » 28 Apr 2013, 10:33

It's funny reading about Billy Bragg because, in a way, he's partly responsible for my move from Left to Right.

A few years ago, I often posted on a music forum. Most of the posters are 40 something males of a leftist disposition who use all sorts of silly usernames. To give you a further idea of their typical behaviour, have a look at Gavin's "Skeptics in the Pub" thread. Let's just say that most of them are crude and smug - that wonderful combination which so predominates in the UK.

Anyway, on this forum of theirs, when the subject of Billy Bragg's sizeable house came up, it was incredible to see the lengths that they went to, just to defend him as a "socialist"; they couldn't even admit that perhaps Mr Bragg was just a bit hypocritical.

Like most on the Left nowadays, you can guess their attitudes on pretty much everything. Their crudeness and self-congratulatory behaviour are ingrained to such an extent that they've never had to and never will question their own attitudes.

I can't say that I've ever liked Billy Bragg's music though.
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Caleb » 28 Apr 2013, 12:54

Jimi Hendrix is/was transgressive? In what way was he any more transgressive than anyone else at the time? David Bowie, I get. Peaches, I get. Jimi Hendrix though?
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Charlie » 28 Apr 2013, 15:11

Speaking of Dalrymple's disdain for popular music, didn't he, during his time as the Spectator's "vulgarity consultant", once review an Oasis concert?

I mention this, because the thought of Dalrymple at an Oasis concert always makes me chuckle. I can just imagine him standing there, in despair at all the Liam clones around him. Then I see him looking at the stage and sticking two figures in his ears as he comes to the chilling realisation that the simian Mancunian twit singing on stage is a multi-millionaire, even after having rhymed the words "alka-seltzer" and "Elsa" together.

Such a gig must have done wonders for Dalrymple's disdain levels!
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Gavin » 28 Apr 2013, 17:30

Charlie wrote:didn't he, during his time as the Spectator's "vulgarity consultant", once review an Oasis concert?


Yes, I think he did! If anyone can find the article let us know. I wonder what he thought of that thug's habit of insulting his fans. They seemed to lap it up but I doubt if TD appreciated it, if he could make out the bellowing through the mic. I quite like Oasis' music - they had some melody etc. but the loutishness combined with egotism was always very off-putting (though not for many Brits, clearly - on the contrary, it was an attraction).

I'd like to be the vulgarity correspondent for a national publication, actually. If any of you are reading this, let me know, if you can afford to pay me! I'll report from the front line for you.
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Charlie » 28 Apr 2013, 19:08

Gavin wrote:I'd like to be the vulgarity correspondent for a national publication.


In this country, there would so much material to write about that you'd have a job for life!

But as far as Dalrymple and modern music is concerned, we all know that it's a front. Everyone knows that he actually likes nothing more than driving around at terrifying speeds to a soundtrack of thrash metal, taking advantage of any traffic lights turning red to let rip with a well-practiced, blazing air guitar solo - "Angel of Death" by Slayer being a particular favourite.
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Mike » 28 Apr 2013, 22:38

Charlie wrote:But as far as Dalrymple and modern music is concerned, we all know that it's a front. Everyone knows that he actually likes nothing more than driving around at terrifying speeds to a soundtrack of thrash metal, taking advantage of any traffic lights turning red to let rip with a well-practiced, blazing air guitar solo - "Angel of Death" by Slayer being a particular favourite.


Nearly fell off my chair laughing at that!
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Charlie » 09 Jun 2013, 11:13

- This post contained an example of extreme pop music degeneracy. It had to be deleted for everyone's sake.
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Gavin » 09 Jun 2013, 12:15

I saw a lot of self-objectification in that video (but silence from feminists, as usual). Also manipulation of men, but that's widely regarded as acceptable or even commendable now.

The video - essentially porn - seemed to be so thick that it was almost like a parody of itself! I've been thinking of making a track parodying such women.. but this is just the wrong side of the line. Bound to be a bestseller.
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Gavin » 09 Jun 2013, 12:19

I just realised I didn't even mention the music. Well, there wasn't any, really. That doesn't seem to matter today though. I particularly dislike this "dubstep" craze - just grating sounds and agressive stutters. Bring back the melody! Music isn't music without melody, in my opinion.
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Charlie » 09 Jun 2013, 15:35

Gavin wrote:I just realised I didn't even mention the music. Well, there wasn't any, really. That doesn't seem to matter today though. I particularly dislike this "dubstep" craze - just grating sounds and agressive stutters. Bring back the melody! Music isn't music without melody, in my opinion.


-
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Gavin » 09 Jun 2013, 16:20

I agree about this terrible misuse of producers' talents. I have have even heard some respected ones say that it doesn't matter whether something is good, just whether it is new, and that it is simply their job to do what the "artists" (or labels) want.

Were I in that position I think I would want to elevate the artist, and if they didn't want that then I wouldn't be able to work with them. I wouldn't be able to work on tracks that were completely nihilistic like that one, either. But then with my input on those terms they probably wouldn't sell as many records as they do now!
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Re: Contemporary popular music

Postby Michael » 10 Jun 2013, 03:20

I couldn't get through that music video. I did make it to the lap dance scene, however, and must note that it was taken from a (vastly superior, in my humble opinion) lap dance scene in Quentin Tarantino's drive-in tribute "Death Proof". The music was catchier and the lady in question more attractive as well.
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