How far back does the Loony Left go?

Thoughts on socialism and leftism generally

How far back does the Loony Left go?

Postby Elliott » 04 Mar 2012, 19:41

Here is a quite infuriating news report on the hard left PC activists operating in London circa 1986:




I say "infuriating" because how else can one describe the feminist education committee (membership: 5) who go through a school's library and remove books which violate their feminist outlook? How else can one describe the African mother who insists her child get African food at his British school? And what about the Indian chap who says traditional mathematics is racist?

As I have said before (in the Ray Honeyford thread), it is sobering to realise that the kind of hard-left, PC, hardcore feminist, multi-culti rubbish we now regard as a hallmark of the New Labour years had actually been in full swing (within the education sector) for at least a decade already.

Not only is the time differential interesting, but also the cultural differential. These people were operating in a quite different Britain to that of today, its citizens far less PC than the average Brit is now and furthermore backed up by the "Victorian values" Tory government of the time. Against that opposition, these Marxists worked - and they appear fearless. They appear not only determined but actually quite complacent. Who is going to oppose them without outing himself as a racist/sexist/snob/imperialist/Christian/bigot? No-one, so regardless of the cultural situation, they have the moral high ground. In fact they have the moral high ground in any situation they could choose to operate in, because they are the Left.

Perhaps it is just me who finds it amazing that this kind of stuff was going on in the 80s. For people who can remember that time, is it not so strange?
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Re: How far back does the Loony Left go?

Postby Gavin » 04 Mar 2012, 21:01

Some shocking stuff in those videos, Elliott. It would be laughable if we did not see how seriously it was taken and where it got us now. I suppose PC was well underway by the 80s, but I was a bit young to notice it.

Most ludicrous in the videos:

  • The analysis of the black horse being tamed by the little white girl and this being deemed racism
  • Socialist mathematics
  • The black woman objecting to her "African" child having to eat British food (in my opinion she should have been told "Sorry, this is Britain")

I used to live in Haringay, actually. That has to be one of the most dysfunctional areas of London now, but it has some stiff competition. I was in Burnt Oak / Edgeware area too the other day and it really felt like I was visiting another country. All over London now, there are these bazaar type shops that set up their stalls all over the pavements and after dark, the streets are populated almost exclusively by people of foreign culture (mainly the same culture that is producing so much gun and knife crime currently, but others antipathetic to that one too).

Anyway, a video like that is unthinkable on British television now, such is the grip of the Left (especially, of course, in the form of the BBC).
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Re: How far back does the Loony Left go?

Postby Rachel » 04 Mar 2012, 23:02

Awww I wanted to watch them but it said "not available in your country". I like watching old BBC News programs from the 80's or even earlier b/c it reminds me of my childhood.

The first time I remember seeing the term "political correctness" was in a Sunday Times article in the early 1990's probably about 1992-3.

The first time I read really extreme political correctness was in a book 1987. In my local library I picked up a book about children's literature. It was different to all the other books on children literature because it criticised Roald Dahl for being racist and deemed every book that I'ed ever read including recent ones in the 70's and 80's as racist, sexist or whatever.
It really really hated Rudyard Kipling.
It did not stop me continuing with my Roald Dahl's and Enid Blytons because I liked them too much.

Also in 1987 Gollywogs were taken out of Enid Blyton books and there was a big fuss about it on the news. Nowadays I understand why black people would be offended by that word and it's the only revision to Enid Blyton books I support.
But before they removed the Golliwogs, I did not know that there was a derogratory connection to black people. I honestly thought Gollywogs were just a fantasy toy like the Wombles, or fairy dolls. I even owned one when I was little in the very early 80's. It was bought from a jumble sale.

When Golliwogs in Enid Blyton were on the news in 1987 I chatted to someone at school about it. He said that he also owned a Gollywog when he was 4 (1980-81 ish). He loved it and took it everywhere. One day his aunt came to visit and said it was racist. She took his Gollywog and threw it in the bin. He told me that he cried when they threw it away because he was very attached to it. I suspect most little kids just saw it as just a cuddley toy and didn't realise the racism connection in it.

I am rambling off topic here because getting rid of golliwogs isn't loony left....But it just brought back the memories.
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Re: How far back does the Loony Left go?

Postby Gavin » 04 Mar 2012, 23:59

Amusing post, Rachel, but I think you might be being a bit PC here! I think golliwogs really were just an inoffensive toy. So what if they were supposed to resemble black people? I think it is sad that Robertsons had to remove their Golly mascot from their jams and that police seized these dolls from shops etc. I just dont see what is offensive about these toys. This is a great example of political correctness gone mad, in my opinion.

I was also raised on Roald Dahl and Enid Blyton and really liked them both. I'm not surprised they've gone the way of PC too - it really is destructive. I do not agree with the rewriting of any literature at all - including the renaming of Joseph Conrad and Agatha Christie novels. This is all unnecessary and far too close to the "history revisionism" of 1984 for my liking.

I am also not surprised the PC Left hated Rudyard Kipling so much - I suppose they regard him the same way as they regard Enoch Powell now, or as "just a colonialist" while having little or no knowledge of his actual life and work.
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Re: How far back does the Loony Left go?

Postby Rachel » 05 Mar 2012, 00:31

That's an interesting point you make Gavin about Golliwogs being just an unoffensive toy and not something to get hysterical enough to ban. I didn't think about it in that way.
I don't know now...
Though I *did* think the removal of Golly mascot on jam was over the top. It was just a small illustration associated with a history of the brand...Not a whole book written about Gollys like this one :
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Three-Golliwogs ... 0603032680

or whole chapters like in the Noddy story.

It's nice that someone else enjoyed their Enid Blytons and Roald Dahls.
Completely agree with everything else you said about the revision of literature.
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Re: How far back does the Loony Left go?

Postby Paul » 05 Mar 2012, 00:51

You beat me to it but I was also dismayed or at least confused about the abolition of Golliwogs. I suppose I was somewhat definitely dismayed when I found out why? Dismayed also because we could see it was the thin end of what was likely to turn into a very large wedge.

The jam thing as well, Why didn't the company just tell (whoever it was) to just shove their ideas? What would have happened if they had done? It wouldn't have stopped me buying their jam - presuming I did do, which isn't guaranteed but not because of Golliwogs or no Golliwogs. In fact, I may have subconciously avoided them because of the latter.

Derek Hatton - remember him? A champagne socialist with a sharp suit and a helicopter on hand.

When the miners' strike erupted in 84, all these lefties were in the streets of the towns, waving placards and screeching inanely, whilst getting hot flushes over the idea of going to demos so they could throw stones. Lots of them were women too, who were neither married to coal miners, nor of course had ever been, or wished to go underground themselves.

I was only 21 but I knew they were absolute fools back then. Bullies too and in the North, they had the whip hand on the social scene.

Oh yes, and I was weaned on Enid Blyton books and at one time may have possessed one hundred of them, all hardbacks, in neat little rows on shelves in the bedroom. Ladybird books too, all great children's reading. By age nine we were reading the Hobbit in school, all CS Lewis' books and tales by 'BB', Jack London and similar calibres as well as the traditional classics of a century and more's fame.
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Re: How far back does the Loony Left go?

Postby Elliott » 05 Mar 2012, 02:18

Paul D wrote:Bullies too and in the North, they had the whip hand on the social scene.
An interesting post, Paul, but I'm curious as to what you mean about lefties having "the whip hand on the social scene"?
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Re: How far back does the Loony Left go?

Postby Paul » 11 Mar 2012, 13:47

Hiya Elliott, sorry for the delay.

Maybe I've overstated things a little, but, in the North West, still then a fairly strong mining area, the strike dominated almost every conversation to be had. Every pub and bar, lots of impromptu music events (local) where the performers were invariably of the protest variety (often quite horrendous Punk bands hastily cobbled together by young activists), even sports clubs. Everyone it seemed was 'in solidarity' with the Miners. It was difficult even to claim you simply weren't interested. You would often be screeched at that this simply wasn't permissible. It will be 'your turn next' was the vague threat.

I turned 21 in May 1984, just as the strike was gathering momentum and as another summer was dawning. At that age and time of year, one wishes to enjoy whatever social scene exists. Going for a drink, listening to live music, attending sports venues and (ahem) chasing girls. The strike overlaid everything of this nature and in addition it seemed that most all of the young ladies were of a leftist persuasion and supportive of the strike. Revolution seems bold and exciting, with a hint of danger. Revolutionaries seemed attractive to the girls, especially if they had a loud mouth.

To be critical of the strike (or aspects of it) was to find oneself marginalised, if not even endangered. Almost everyone of my age group was whole-heartedly behind the strike. The best you could do was to just keep quiet and not get drawn ointo any conversation.

Maybe I've not posted this very well. It's all a long time ago but I do remember that Summer as politicised in almost every aspect. It seemed impossible to escape for much longer than 15 minutes. You couldn't even go shopping in town without coming across a protest group having some small demonstration, with the inevitable collection for the Strikers - tinned food as well as money. It was as though the area was under siege by some malign foreign power and it was everyone's duty to chip in. I recall a group almost continually encamped outside the town's Employment Exchange (dole office), heckling those people unemployed and attending to 'sign-on'. It seemed to me that these were the last people who could really afford to be giving money away, but it also seemed that these people were expected to agree it was their duty to do so. In solidarity in their unemployment with those striking from employment, as if the unemployed were also the victims of an oppressive government.

Yes, it was everywhere and I for one was glad when it was all over and you didn't have to suffer political views being imposed upon you.
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