Germany and the refugee crisis

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Re: Germany and the refugee crisis

Postby Gavin » 29 Jan 2016, 22:24

Thanks - will look forward to reading that.

I think you probably have to go to the "right" places to see the stuff. I remember driving from Calais to Paris a few years ago and not really seeing much. I have no doubt it was there, but we just didn't go a route that took us through the affected suburbs. The life of the tourist rather than the resident... It's probably a lot harder to avoid now and that will increasingly be the case.
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Re: Germany and the refugee crisis

Postby Jonathan » 31 Jan 2016, 19:19

I'm also looking forward to that.

Last weekend the Israeli press carried another one of those translated-from-Der-Spiegel articles about Europe and the refugee crisis. It was actually a rather mixed article (or concatenation of articles), more balanced than I expected. Pegida, unfortunately, got the standard knee-jerk extremist-right-wing treatment, but the events at Cologne were not whitewashed.

By an interesting coincidence, the same paper carried a long article about a biography of a Wehrmacht officer recently published in Germany. He started out as an average card-carrying Nazi, but was so horrified by what he saw in Poland that he spent most of his time trying to save Jews and Catholics. Towards the end of the war he was taken prisoner by the Russians, and, sadly, perished in their camps. The research is based on his diary and letters which he wrote during the war.

It made me wonder if such books are coming out more frequently in Germany nowadays, and - if so - what it might mean. I wonder if it might portend a shift in how Germans view their history, at once both acknowledging the horrors they inflicted, but at the same time finding German soldiers who can be held up as role-models both for military duty and moral righteousness. The stress here is on German soldiers - not foreigners, not pacificsts or civilians or renegades or mutineers. I wonder if there is a thirst for such stories in Germany today, for men who both did their duty towards the nation, and at the same time cleansed their hands of the Nazi stain.

If so, it might create an interesting parallel with the Israeli memory of the Holocaust. In Israel, there is a Memorial day for the Holocaust and Heroism. The sad fact that millions of Jews were slaughtered like sheep ran right across the grain of the new Zionist ethos. The solution was to cultivate the few occasions of rebellion, and to glorify the men who took part in them. The preferred date for the Memorial day was the start of the Warsaw ghetto uprising (though it had to be moved because of its proximity to Passover). It would be interesting if the Germans wound up taking a similar route.
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Re: Germany and the refugee crisis

Postby Nathan » 25 Feb 2016, 21:04

Well, I've been here a month now, and as far as the refugee crisis is concerned, I'm quite frustrated to say that I honestly haven't seen that much!

Of course it's wrong to just assume any dark-skinned person in Germany = refugee, but I see small groups of non-German speaking foreigners just hanging around looking bored every now and again. Some look menacing, though quite a lot don't. You seem to see them around railway stations a lot more, but Munich and Nuremberg stations were the only places I've noticed a particularly dodgy atmosphere, a lot of the time walking down the street in everyday life though it feels as if the past six months haven't actually happened. There are regional elections in Germany next month and AfD are expected to do well, but even so, I have read stories of politicians refusing to share a platform with AfD candidates.

It's disappointing how I haven't felt able to bring the topic up in conversation when talking to Germans - none of them have mentioned it when talking to me, and I haven't wanted to put somebody on the spot by deliberately steering conversation towards the refugee issue. I'm assuming a lot of Germans would be reluctant to tell a foreigner they were against the whole thing as well. The closest I've got to anybody telling me what they thought was on a train, when the two men sitting in front of me having a very loud conversation in Arabic finally got off and the older woman sitting to my side turned to me and shook her head in resignation as if to say "Oh God..."

You hear stories of refugee misbehaviour nearly every day, usually either a brawl in a refugee shelter or somebody's been molested, or something like that. The closest I've come to seeing anything like that first hand was that I was on the same underground line in Munich on the same day as this incident happened, some refugees (who it later turned out had had their applications refused but hadn't been deported because of human rights laws) harassing a woman and then attacking a much older man who came to the woman's aid.



The bulk of the negative coverage in the MSM here seems to be on the logistical issues of accommodating so many people and on how disappointed they are in how the rest of Europe doesn't want to share the love. It is almost as if they see it all just as one big organisational challenge. Even though I occasionally read about how they are going to manage to deport all those whose applications are failed, there seems to be no let up in the official line that this influx is still a good thing. Yet when you read the papers online, as ever, 95% of the reader comments are strongly anti-refugee.

I was expecting to at least see some anti-refugee graffiti, but I haven't at all, apart from one "Refugees Not Welcome" sticker which had actually had the "Not" scrubbed off. The usual Antifa / "No human being is illegal!" / "No Nazis" type of graffiti is easy to find just like more or less everywhere I have been in Germany.

Even though I haven't actually heard anybody's views on the refugee issue, you can still get a strong sense of how the social pressure not to openly oppose it is much stronger than in Britain. It's probably not too surprising how this is done, i.e. by playing on the Nazi-era guilt. I went to Nuremberg for the day, obviously best known as the site of the Nazi Party rallies and the racial purity laws, and first of all noticed how many foreigners there were (Wikipedia says 37% of the population of foreign origin even without the refugees), but what got me most was that the street which the Germanic National Museum is on has actually been renamed "Straße der Menschenrechte" (Human Rights Street), and has 20 or 30 big plinths down the street with excerpts from the Universal Declaration of Human Rights translated into dozens of different languages. At one end there is a list of the people killed by the far-right group the National Socialist Underground and a sign identical to one you would see at the entrance to the city saying "Nuremberg: No Place for Racism".

I don't know much about Regensburg other than recently having been there and seen how beautiful it is, but the overt anti-racism drive there seemed to be on another level altogether even if probable refugees seemed to be fewer and further between. There appeared to be a local initiative in the city centre for pubs and restaurants to display stickers saying "Racists are not served here". Reading a free newspaper all about what was going on in the city that month one of the events that caught my eye was a week-long exhibition at the youth centre about "the dangers of far-right extremism in Bavaria" - not a state generally associated with having a lot of far-right extremism in the modern day. I would find it hard to live in an oppressive social environment like that even though I am not German.

Last week there was a case of a bus carrying refugees to a village in eastern Germany being blocked by a mob of protesters shouting "We are the people!"



It certainly wasn't a pretty sight, but the media has really gone into overdrive in seeing who can condemn it the most without addressing the issue of why it happened in the first place. Even Bild, the only real tabloid in Germany and more or less the only newspaper that publishes a lot of the stories of refugee misbehaviour that would be on the front page of most British newspapers, ran six different articles condemning it on just one day.

There are quite a few volunteer initiatives aimed at helping the refugees, so there does appear to still be some genuine popular support. Looking through the local library I saw a man of about 70 helping a very non-threatening looking Middle Eastern man learn German, and perhaps the most surprising "This wouldn't happen at home" moment happened in a queue at the supermarket: on realising the two men he was serving didn't speak German, the boy on the checkout (he didn't even look old enough to get a job) asked them in English where they were from, to which the answer was Syria. He said "Welcome to Germany" and asked them how to say "Hello" in their language. When they gave him an answer he thanked them and said he was going to try that word out on his Arab friends.

In a way it would actually be easier if the refugees I have seen actually did all look menacing and that they all were causing trouble, because at least then you could reasonably imagine the Germans being pushed far enough to reverse this influx. Then again, when you consider that we are talking here about a million largely young men, living in overcrowded refugee shelters with little to do, away from their families in an alien country, isn't a certain level of trouble to be expected, even with people of any background?

The latest official estimate I have read today was that 3.6 million refugees can be expected up to 2020, though I have no idea how anybody could predict any number. That will inevitably be skewed towards the younger age groups, in a country where the old outnumber the young. It is such a shame that things will have to get worse before anything will really change.
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Re: Germany and the refugee crisis

Postby Gavin » 26 Feb 2016, 11:44

Thanks for this update - much appreciated. I hope more will be forthcoming! I have some questions which you might be able to get around to answering:

You mentioned that the Germans seem to be very optimistic, some might say naive, about the Muslim influx into their country - for example the boy in the shop. Are you able to detect the attitude of the migrants themselves? Do they seem to be appreciative, or quietly in awe of how easy this is for them? To me, it just seems that for the most part this is simply an invasion without (for the most part) weapons. Many who doubtless should not be there have simply imposed themselves upon the country, skipping many other countries to get there. I am sure it is hard to detect, but what seems to be the manner of he "refugees"? The ones you have seen. Are they assertive, bold, or humble and grateful? In Calais they seem threatening and aggressive, as in Cologne of course. I'm sure there is a variety, and that is exactly the problem: only the truly grateful and needy should be there in my view - probably only the women and children, and even then only temporarily.

From what you say there seems to be no mention at all in German society of the elephant in the room: that these are not just people, but people of an utterly different culture, and having thousands more come into German society will change that society (even more). Is mention of this verboten? Nationalism seems to be been so much destroyed by the failure/record of Nazism that Germans want to lose their cultural identity and have it subsumed into Islam. Or do they genuinely believe that these immigrants will simply stop being Muslim soon and embrace the secularism of Germany?

I was intrigued by the boy in the shop. Do you generally see multicultural gangs or groups out and about socialising together. One almost never sees that in the UK. Do, instead, the immigrants (even second, third gen.) tend to prefer to associate with their ethnic companions - and likewise with native Germans? I appreciate it may be difficult to tell.

(I have corrected the second YouTube video ID which needed a "d-".)

Do you see any evidence that German media have reported at all on any negative behaviour from Muslim migrants? For example it is now known that there were around 600 sexual attacks in Cologne alone on NYE. Virtually all, if not all, suspects are North African (Muslims) and police say none might be convicted.

Do the media seem to even know about this video?



I imagine everything is buried as much as possible - as indeed it is by most of the British media. If they get to a story at all, they get to it late.

I am currently reading Soumission (the English translation), prior to visiting the south of France next month. It's a chilling read because it is so plausible. As Marine Le Pen said, this is quite possibly how matters will unfold. The book is slightly obscene, but then Houellebecq is known for this and he is after all portraying a somewhat degenerate leftist academic who ultimately is part of the problem that has led to this situation. See Dalrymple's review of the book here. I probably won't see a lot going on in Cannes and Nice - any French who can will likely flee to here and to the countryside I imagine as their cities are made increasingly less French and more Arabic, but I too will report.

One further thing: Germans are apparently unconcerned by cultural changes wrought by the mass immigration. Do they seem concerned about the sheer economic cost? You do mention they wish other EU countries would "share the love" - Greece is becoming very worked up about this too instead of returning the opportunistic migrants (colonisers for Islam, essentially) to their homelands.

I hope you are having an enjoyable time out there anyway and look forward to more eyewitness reportage. This is our most reliable source for news now, because the MSM is so self-censored. I often wonder, for example, how the BBC must manage when they try a vox-pop of public opinion on the subject of Muslim colonisation of British towns. They must stop people in the street, ask the question, then either abort the interview immediately or simply say to each other afterwards: "Ditch that one - we'll keep looking". I know I would tell them the truth if they asked me - that the British are entitled to their country as they had it before - and I don't think they would broadcast it!
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Re: Germany and the refugee crisis

Postby Nathan » 26 Feb 2016, 13:52

Thanks Gavin. Unfortunately there won't be any more updates though, since I'm going back home at the weekend!

In response to your questions, it's hard to say what the migrants themselves think of it all. A fair few of them give off a snarling, don't-mess-with-me vibe, but isn't that just normal of Arab people wherever they are, and the kind of attitude you need to have to survive in a society where it's every man for himself? They certainly seem more pushy and assertive than Germans in any case, even if I've never personally felt threatened by them.

There seems to be no open acknowledgement at all of the fact that these people's descendants will never just blend in and it is the German society that will obviously have to make the changes. It all seems to be about how the refugees are the victims here and the Germans need to make the effort to be understanding of the culture clash they face. A few weeks ago a university professor even proposed introducing Arabic as a compulsory language in all schools "to improve the integration of refugees" and "to acknowledge that Germany is an country of immigration and a multi-lingual society". It will never actually happen, but it gives a good idea of the kind of mentality that's driving things over here.

A disproportionate amount of the attacks on refugee shelters, plus the mob incident in the video I linked to above (thanks for sorting the link out Gavin, I did wonder what I'd done wrong!) come from Saxony, which I believe is also where Yessica comes from - if you could add your thoughts to all this, Yessica, then we would very much appreciate it!.

I've always felt an affinity with the area because it's the one state in particular that the rest of the country makes fun of even at the best of times, but now more so than ever Saxony-bashing seems to be the one acceptable form of prejudice in the German media. The usual words: "backwards", "xenophobic", "scared", letting the country down, shooting themselves in the foot because now nobody will want to do business with them, etc. One article in Stern which irritatingly I can't seem to track down now seemed incredulous that according to some survey or other 60% of people living in Saxony had said they were scared of the refugee influx as opposed to 38% (which is still rather a lot!) in the country as a whole.

What annoyed me most about that article was how it referred to Saxons as "the most German of all Germans" as if that was supposed to be a bad thing and the way it contrasted the heavy local accent of the mob shouting "Wir sind das Volk!"/"We are the people!" with the fact that a banner held up by anti-racist demonstrators in the photo opposite read "Refugees are welcome here" in English. German = "small-minded, provincial", English = "tolerant and open"...

As for visible signs of integration, mixed-race couples etc, I haven't seen much at all, but I'm not really in the best place to tell. Apart from the refugees, the town I am in is large majority Germans with about 5-10% or so eastern and southern Europeans and ~5% or so Turks. I think I've seen one mixed-race couple as far as I can remember, I get the impression that they are less common than in Britain.

Re. the cost, it stands to reason that the financial costs must be enormous, but as far as I am aware the German budget surplus for last year was big enough that they can cover it, for now at least. Because of the lower birth rates in recent years there are a lot more people coming up for retirement age than entering the workforce, and particularly where I am in Bavaria I do see a lot of job vacancies and apprenticeship opportunities being advertised. This influx of young people is being pushed as a potential cure to the country's labour shortage, though I have no idea how many of them are genuinely capable or willing to fill the jobs available.

Crime and other negative behaviour by refugees is reported on, or at least some of it, but they never seem to make the next logical step of "if so many of them can't behave themselves, this influx must be a bad idea and should be stopped ASAP". The media coverage seems to be aimed either at generating as much sympathy for the migrants as possible or excusing their behaviour and coming up with some new scheme to integrate them. If a group of Arab men can't walk past a lone woman without hassling her, then simple: we'll just introduce a compulsory course for all refugees about how men and women have equal status under the German constitution and the problem is bound to go away.

I've tried to understand the thought processes at work here as best I can, but I haven't had enough first-hand experience to be able to say any more, and of course I'm not German. Yessica, where are you?!
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Re: Germany and the refugee crisis

Postby Jonathan » 26 Feb 2016, 23:15

Fascinating report, Nathan. I think that your very first point is an especially important one - there can be a vast gap between the appearance on television and the reality on the ground. I'm sadly familiar with this fact regarding MIddle East reporting, though of course that did not stop me from making that same mistake about Germany.

The social pressure to conform to the official line seems a bit like a cork in the bottle, or a dam on a stream. Yessica described how that looks from the inside, and it seems like you got to see it first-hand from the outside. I wonder what will happen when it breaks? Will there be a shift to the right, or will the pendulum swing wildly?

As an aside, I had to laugh at how careful you were not to discomfit your acquaintances there. I have a sneaking suspicion I would not have been so delicate. Not in public, certainly, but in a private chat outside of a work environment I would have been hard-pressed not to steer the conversation in that direction. Though I don't really know what sort of friendships you were able to form in so short a time, so my suppositions may be quite irrelevant.


Do tell us what you think of Soumission when you finish it, Gavin (and I'm not referring only to the juicy bits). Dalrymple's review makes such good reading I have a premonition that the book may be a disappointment in the end. I find it especially interesting that such a book had to be translated from French. Are there no such books being written in English? You'd think there would be a whole sub-genre by now, but all I've stumbled across is this short story, which I have not read, but which got good reviews. It's worth noting that the book was self-published and that the author lives in France.

As for the economic cost, I'm guessing Yessica will say that each subsequent prediction of higher economic costs merely increases the German sense of virtue at having adopted this policy. Politically speaking, to admit any financial limit on housing refugees is also to admit that there is a financial limit on bailing out Greece. I'm not sure any Eurocrat would do that, when a pretence of economic omnipotence is all that keeps the euro afloat.
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Re: Germany and the refugee crisis

Postby Gavin » 29 Feb 2016, 22:57

I'll let you know what I think of Soumission when finished - now about 70% through. I am trying to do a lot more reading these days. There is this work on the loss of England currently being experienced by our people. (Of course, this is never reviewed or mentioned by the media - I'm surprised it is allowed even to be on sale!)

By the way, "our people". Do you know, we cringe when we say this? Apparently white people are the only people who do. We think even that tiny phrase is unspeakably racist. I'm sure Jews say it all the time. As do black people - and of course Muslims ("brother" this, "brother" that). In a sense, I can understand the reluctance, since we are saying can't everyone be "our people", potentially? Well, that right there - at the moment - is the $50m question. Or rather, it's worth a lot more that that. I can very much see people polarising along ethnic lines soon, because of the onslaught of mass immigration that has been allowed - and in some cases deliberately encouraged - by European politicians. That will likely cause the same civil unrest/war on shared land masses as it has every time before.

In terms of reaction to the migrant invasion, I have been looking at a bit more radical stuff on the Net recently - just seeing what's out there. It turns out there is a "far right" and they're not UKIP ;) But as I say, with the insane behaviour of our leaders, some of these are looking at lot "nearer". There is a group in the UK called National Action. These are very far right - they are open Nazis, but the striking thing as well is that they are very young - merely a youth group. I think we are talking about a very small number of people here though, unlike the far left, but they are apparently already under surveillance by the Counter-Terrorism Unit.

We have a spectrum here, and looking further I read about various established BNP figures (for example one very articulate Matt Tait, and the late Jonathan Bowden) who certainly made some sound points. We have our "alt" or "new" right - who it seems to me are actually not very different in their arguments to the "old" radical right, really. Characters like Greg Johnson, RamZpaul, Richard Spencer - others who I'm sure we know! Some are anti-semitic, some are not. (I'm not, by the way. I'm sure some Jews are responsible for "cultural Marxism", but not all Jews are, and not only Jews are. I'm with Paul Weston and Jared Taylor on that particular matter. I would, however, ban their ritual slaughter, along with halal of course, as we have mentioned before.)

There is also this group London Forum. I used to think the Traditional Britain Group were just about cups of tea and great British literature but they are in fact quite hardcore (Gregory Lauder-Frost said on national radio that he would like to see the deportation of all black people and I personally don't agree with that, either). They are not as hardcore, though, perhaps, as London Forum. Participants appear to range from mere nationalists to fascists and even Nazis and I would expect London Forum to be proscribed before long. They have numerous high profile speakers and their conference caused a sensation with the MSM. (I don't like holocaust deniers - this seems to me idiotic and is one major place where Nick Griffin went wrong.) There are, as I say, a range of speakers, though, and some are very good. In Yessica's absence (I will PM her to see if she can offer us any more information) here for example is a German man who gives a sober inside view of the current gross misgovernment of Germany. I found this very interesting:



It is understandable that a population should object to being displaced by an influx of thousands of people of a very different culture (and language), especially when the incoming cultures are primitive and the people are mostly dependents who do not even intend to adopt the language of the host nation (nor are obliged to do so). It is in fact a soft colonisation and disintegration which we are having to both fund and suffer, and with Islam in the mix an even more potentially lethal one. We're in for an interesting few years, I think, years of polarisation brought about arguably by massive treachery from the Left against the people who elected them (I include David Cameron approximately in the Left, unlike some of his ministers who are now deserting him).
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Re: Germany and the refugee crisis

Postby Ernest » 01 Mar 2016, 13:41

The UK is multi-racial now whether these people like it or not. They can rally round the patron saint of lost causes all they want but they're not going to change that. The horse bolted a long time ago.

The UK can be multi-cultural as well, I don't care, just as long as that paedophile, mass murdering rapey bloke from way back is not part of the multi-mix.

The problems that come from communities living separate existences would all be solved in the long run if we just kicked the welfare habit. The necessities of work would force people to learn English and integrate more. Of course if we let things slide for long enough, we could end up with separate states within our former countries, with independent economies. That's why we have to get busy now before its too late, and vote our feeble leaders out of office before things get any worse.
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Re: Germany and the refugee crisis

Postby Gavin » 18 Mar 2016, 15:16

I agree with Ernest on this. Many of society's problems could be addressed via welfare reform, without having to involve issues of ethnicity. This would have the benefit of addressing the problem of the underclass in the UK at the same time. Personally, I would start by reducing and then abolishing child benefit - I see no reason why one person should pay another who chooses to have children (though at the same time I would encourage European women to choose marriage and children over careers - not least for their own fulfilment). Also the straightforward abolition of stifling political correctness would help a lot. For example, it might be that black people commit most robberies, and if this is a fact it should not be deemed "racist" to state it - but this hardly means all black people should be deported simply for being black.

Personally, I am "race-realist" in that I accept there are broad differences in aptitudes between races, but not racist or ethno-nationalist, and I think people still have to be treated as individuals. I am "culturist", however, in that I think it is obvious that some cultures are better than others, and when one goes to a country one should try to fit in, and not self-segregate and transform it (especially backwards!). Ethno-nationalism seems to be slightly absurd and impractical now as everyone is doing their DNA tests and coming back with various percentages, and I'm not sure it is very important frankly precisely what those percentages are.

Consequences for actions, and abolition of political correctness are in my view sufficient to be able to plot a corrective course (this includes being able to state the truth about Islam), which is why I rather support the likes of Stefan Molyneux (though I don't think I am a libertarian), rather than some of the more radical alt-Right figures. However, I think matters may polarise more racially anyway, unfortunately, if that correction course is not plotted.

On another topic, I will be slowing down on the Twitter shortly! This is because I think figures like David Vance, Tommy Robinson and Paul Joseph Watson do a sterling job against PC, third wave feminism, Islam and socialism and they do it as their personal identity online whereas I just tweet backup really. I don't know how they find the time, but I need to spend more time on work and generating income! So I will not be actively looking for things to tweet, or reading much Twitter now, but will tweet occasionally, and will keep auto-tweeting links related to Dalrymple etc.

p.s. Submission was a great read! Somewhat vulgar in places, but generally very good and a cautionary tale about how Leftists tend to appease Islam and would be the first to side with it, but would thereby be dominated by it.
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Re: Germany and the refugee crisis

Postby Jonathan » 18 Mar 2016, 23:22

I also agree on Welfare reform. It's the sort of thing that a determined government might push through, and it could have a significant effect over the course of a few years. Contrast that with loosening the corset of political correctness, which will take at least a generation to undo, and seems to me to be more in the power of society than any government.

I've also never been too keen on genetic testing as a determinant of nationhood. There are too many ways a People's DNA makeup can change over the years, such as 3 centuries of Danish invasions, or a plague killing off 1/3 of the population without taking the trouble to eliminate a statistically balanced sample. Besides, a Nation is more than a collection of genes; it is also a culture, a language, an idea, and genetic testing is blind to these things.

I'm glad to hear you also recommend Soumission. I shall tack it onto my list, perhaps after the venerable Bede (don't ask). I've got the other book you recommended (Dark Albion) on my shelf already. I remember coming away with mixed impressions; at any rate, I don't think anyone would say that it sparked a new genre - though I have, I think, seen its name mentioned in some comment threads on the spectator. Perhaps its main effect still lies in the future. This book (Caliphate, by Tom Kratman) is more like what I was hoping to find, though books like it seem few and far between.

I also found your survey of the more extreme parts of the British right-wing to be eye-opening, especially since I don't often venture into places where I know I will not be welcome. The German fellow seems quite sober, though I have not yet had the time to listen through to the end. I found it interesting that he chose to begin with that Churchill quote about the Germans, and even more interesting that most of his audience seemed to know it.
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Re: Germany and the refugee crisis

Postby Jonathan » 05 Apr 2016, 18:13

Well, I finally got around to watching the whole of the Karl Richter video. To be honest, I'm not quite sure what to make of it.

For the first half-hour or so, I hardly found a single word I disagreed with. He described the effect of the waves of immigration, the importance of preserving a German Germany, and comments on the media and the political scene. He provides many facts, and discusses their significance in a rational manner.

Then he seems to finish his prepared speech, and starts to talk off the cuff. And he says strange things. For example, that Germany is not a sovereign country because its policy is entirely controlled by the USA. This strikes me as low-grade Demagoguery. Israel is ten times more dependent on the USA than Germany, and even in Israel's case that would still be demagoguery. Nobody in the USA is stopping Merkel from reversing her disastrous policy. He says that many USA drone strikes originate in bases in Germany without noticing the leverage that this gives Germany over the USA.

Then it gets worse. He says that in Germany you can now be put in jail for using the number 88, supposedly a code for Heil Hitler. He says this as if it were the mad fantasy of an overzealous public prosecutor. But 88 is often used as code for precisely that - I'm quite sure I've seen this myself, though I've gone to no great lengths to look for it. Now it is quite possible to argue that it is wrong to make the use of such terms an offense - even to say that outlawing them is justified morally, but in practice is doing more harm than good - but the pretense that there is no connection is just that - a pretense. He's being coy. One gets the feeling that he would be happy to praise quite a few policies of Hitler, and is resentful that the law will not allow him to do that. And his audience eats it up.

I'm not sure what to make of this. It's perplexing that a man perceptive enough to understand the problem, and brave enough to describe it in plain terms, also seems to lean towards a particular kind of solution.

I hasten to add that none of my comments should be interpreted as criticism for posting the video.

Apart from that I also had the opportunity to watch two Tommy Robinson videos. The Oxford Club one was quite interesting, with many details not covered in his book. Particularly chilling was the number of times he explained that he could not speak freely for fear of being sent back to jail. His interview with Gad Saad mostly covered topics which he discussed at length in his book. This Saad fellow seems interesting - a Canadian professor, Jewish, and a refugee from Lebanon. He's got a channel on youtube dedicated to fighting political correctness: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLH7qU ... CVaHA7RegA , and no illusions about Islam.
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Re: Germany and the refugee crisis

Postby Danny » 07 Apr 2016, 14:30

Disturbing article on Breitbart:

Police Raid Apartments Over ‘Right-Wing’ Social Media Posts

It’s clear that the raids are part of a campaign to intimidate those feel uneasy about the migrant crisis into silence:

“[Police] say that anyone who says something xenophobic, spreads hate toward migrants, or shares what they consider to be xenophobic music, may be next on the list of apartments to be raided in the future.”

“[Police spokesman] Redlich says that the team is constantly searching YouTube, Twitter, WhatsApp and especially Facebook where most cases are pursued because users are forced to use their real names. He said the message of the raids is clear, “the internet is not above the law.”

The monitoring of WhatsApp – a private messaging service – is especially disturbing.

Anyway, the digested read: A government, blinded by ideology, makes a series of terrific blunders and arrests those who dare draw attention to the fact. 21st Century Germany everyone.
Danny
 
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Joined: 07 Apr 2016, 09:20

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