Urban decay in the UK

Examples of social decline, especially in the UK

Urban decay in the UK

Postby Gavin » 19 Feb 2012, 23:54

I'm afraid this is just something of an anecdotal post, which I could have tagged onto another thread, but I thought I would make it its own. Hopefully it will make for interesting reading especially for our foreign readers...

I am a lover of curry, but I'm not sure it's been a price worth paying for the all the associated problems of mass immigration into the UK. I mention this because on this particular visit to London I'm staying in a hotel near the Tower of London, and this is within walking distance (though a fairly long walk) of the either famous or notorious, depending on your point of view, Brick Lane.

Brick Lane might be considered the epicentre of multiculturalism in London, though there are certainly many competitors. It's a long road, spoken of lovingly by all self-respecting left wingers. I've been to Brick Lane a few times in the past, but this time it struck me how run down it is. Of course the Whitechapel area has always been run down, but you would think residents would have got their act together by now. All of East London has now become "fashionable". Camden Town is fashionable too - I used to live there and can confirm that that is a dump also (it is where Amy Winehouse chose to live and where she died).

Brick Lane is a long road running north to south in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. That's the same borough where "Sharia Zone" notices have been seen at bus stops recently.

I don't think I have ever seen as many nose rings in one place as I did today, and that was just on individual noses. The area is populated exclusively, it seems, by ultra liberals and an ever growing number of Pakistanis and Bangladeshis (or people of such heritage, if that is what is supposed to be said now). It is well known for being lined with restaurants, but actually not for their quality: if you search on the Internet you find that really none are recommended. I found that their patrons still stand out on the pavement saying things such as "You want free wine? Free poppadoms?" - generally trying to tempt customers inside for what will turn out to be at best a mediocre dining experience. Needless to say, truly good establishments do not need to use these tactics.

Aside from the usual overheard F words from the "easily led" nose ring folks, other language I heard this evening was "Skunk? Skunk?" from a passing gentleman. I think he was offering rather than requesting. I didn't see any police although there is a station actually on Brick Lane (needs must). One hopes (but doubts) they are undercover.

Brick Lane is a sort of mish-mash, sure, but only someone who has never seen a rainbow could really call it "vibrant". It's shabby, like Elephant & Castle has become, and Portobello Road is not much better in my opinion. Indeed it is a quite a menacing street to walk down late at night, and I would certainly not wish to be any closer to central Tower Hamlets after nightfall. Mind you, there are many UK streets I would not wish to walk on after nightfall.

Now I consider these matters, I remember the times I have been attacked in London. Two attempted muggings and being shoved to the floor by an asylum seeker for not stepping into the gutter to leave the pavement free for him. These incidents were in Camden Town and Harringay and occurred more that ten years ago now. I think that wasn't bad for the amount of time I spent in London. I know of people who have had it far worse. One man with a guitar on his back had his phone stolen outside Balham station and ran after the mugger, even with the guitar. Eventually the criminal bored of running and turned around. The victim said "You have my phone!". The mugger replied "Yeah. What are you going to do about it?" After a moment the man just walked away again and told me this story. Shortly before my leaving Balham a road was filled with armed police after a gang of feral black/brown/African descent/whatever the permitted phrase is youngsters stormed through the area and (so the police told me) disposed of a gun in some bushes.

I suppose my overall point in this posting is that squalor should not be considered "cool". There is pressure to consider it so, but it it isn't really. If the residents of the places I describe were really "proud", you'd think they would buy tins of paint to improve their premises. Paint is cheap. They don't bother. They want the government to do it. It seems to me these areas are getting worse and worse, and I hadn't been to Brick Lane for about 5 years.

Can you describe any areas which have been enriched in this manner?
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Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Paul » 21 Feb 2012, 00:08

Surely everywhere, all over the country?

I'm in the North West, in a (once) industrialised little suburb of Lancashire (Gtr Manchester since 1974 of course - which still rankles with me for some reason). It's not safe hardly anywhere (towns) once nightfall arrives.

Although there are obviously plenty of immigrants (I can but shudder at the thoughts of Oldham, Blackburn, Burnley), plenty of places are unsafe because of predominantly (or additionally) feral white youths or indeed people. I'm thinking Salford, only 12 miles away, and many suburbs of Manchester itself. I wouldn't advise anyone to visit Wigan town centre for a 'night out' on any weekend or probably any night at all. Everywhere else will be the same. Even in the centre of my own small town I don't feel safe at nightfall. I would not for any reason walk the streets of Salford at night or in fact any of the estates, not that far from the main trunk roads, at any time.

There are still other areas of the NW where immigrants, or ethnic minorities are plentiful. Manchester has its own saga to tell of violent and murderous crime, much of it in the black community. Liverpool will be the same.

The link on another thread to the tale told by the Churchman's wife who describes Birmingham, is horrific.

I applaud but am also astonished that anyone could live in London. Obviously a lot of people do (and have to ) live there. But...........?

Not that I ever go but I hear and read so much about it. How does anyone cope?
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Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Gavin » 21 Feb 2012, 10:04

Hello Paul, good to see you here again. Agreed, no town centre in the UK is a pleasant place to go after dark for any civilised person now. In this I have to count even small towns, and I can easily present first hand evidence again:

A couple of years ago I stayed the night in a pub which offered bed and breakfast in the picturesque town of Woodstock, which is where the splendid Blenheim Palace is located. I heard the F word, and many other obscenities, more than 200 times outside my window that evening as residents of the town got drunk and "had a good time". This went on until after 1am.

Manchester strikes me as a threatening place with great racial tensions. A bit like Luton, and all the other places you mention, I suppose. I see Channel 4 is putting on a documentary equating the EDL with Islam4UK soon, calling them "far right" again. I don't like many in the EDL but they are certainly not "far right"! That is just slander, as the organisation has objected. Predictable from the MSM.
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Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Elliott » 21 Feb 2012, 17:24

I was in Manchester last year. I believe it was a Friday night. That would seem likely, because the city centre was full of gangs of teen and 20-something "clubbers". I remember being quite taken aback by their gait, their general demeanor, their "I own the world" attitude as they roved across the streets and squares, half drunk, some of them having internal arguments - including a man and woman shouting obscenities at each other.

The next day I was in Leeds. I remember a general sense of despondency (it was raining lightly) around the city, punctuated by marauding hen parties, like this:

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The women were all dressed identically, each wearing a slinky top with a nickname printed on it, based on her real name - Saucy Sue, Naughty Naomi, Randy Ruth, Horny Helen, Kinky Kate, etc. As for the bride-to-be, she was wearing the same costume but for the addition of a bridal headpiece. (All in the best possible taste.) Though the headpiece was white as snow, I was dismayed to see that she wasn't wearing an L-plate round her neck - some confusion there.

I wouldn't say I felt threatened by these hen parties but the Dalrympean absence of dignity was very evident in Leeds. The only nice person I met was a second-hand Christian bookseller who told me the country was facing "a crisis of faith".

Manchester was worse. I have to say that Mancunians do seem to be very in-yer-face, loud and obnoxious. The only nice people I met there were bouncers (whom I asked for street directions) and the bellman at my hotel, who spent 10 minutes telling me about the history of a majestic Victorian building nearby. I honestly think these people are really happy to be contending with someone who isn't drunk and aggressive; you can see that they love to help and to chat about anything when they meet someone who isn't shouting obscenities into the air.

As for Brick Lane, I did venture there once when I lived in London. It was one of two places in London where I got homophobic insults hurled at me (in those days I was an art student and wore a purple leather coat). The other place was Tooting. In both cases, the insults came from young Asian men. In Brick Lane, the men specifically told me to get out of the area because "you don't belong here".

Come to think of it, I actually can't remember if that incident in Brick Lane was to do with how I was dressed, or if it was simply racist. I didn't wear that coat everywhere.
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Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Caleb » 22 Feb 2012, 04:42

As an Australian, I am ashamed to say that some of the worst foreigners in England are Australians (and New Zealanders and South Africans). Most of the time I was in England, I lived and associated with non-Antipodeans, but on the occasions when I did live with them or go out with them, all hell would break loose (which I, as the only non-drinker, would witness in sober horror).

Also, those stag and hen nights are the last gasp. During my time in Europe, I spent over a year (in total) in various parts of Eastern Europe. In some places, such as Prague, they'd already been in full swing for a long time. However, I remember being in Bratislava for possibly the first (major) one there. Bratislava's city centre is fairly small. A group of English guys had rented a mobile billboard and made a huge display with a picture of a friend who appeared to be drunk and a caption that said something like "Davo's Carry-on up the Danube". I remember standing at a traffic light as it was driven past and the look of complete bewilderment on the faces of all the Slovaks with me. I thought, "Not here too!" Later that evening, I did indeed witness Davo and his friends carrying on.

Does anyone remember this? http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/8185159.stm

Also, during that time that I was in Bratislava, there was a major football championship being held in Portugal. One news report covered it succinctly. They showed a banner hanging from a bridge. On the banner was written "English, if you can't behave yourselves, go home!"

Yet all of that absolutely pales in comparison to what happens in Southeast Asia. One of my strongest memories of Southeast Asia will be getting up in the early hours of the morning to catch a plane out of Bali back to Taiwan. My wife and I had to run an assault course of (mostly) Antipodeans who were bare-chested and throwing up in the street, local men groping drunk Western women, and people openly trying to sell me the services of prostitutes in front of my wife.

In many ways, Western tourism has probably enriched the lives of people in poorer parts of the world, but the locals have also often sold their souls in the process. It also seems that the greater the wealth gap between the two cultures involved, the worse the problem is.

Other nationalities can run amok on alcohol, but there seems to be a particular and voluminous degeneracy -- whether at home or abroad -- amongst the British and their closely related Antipodean and South African brethren in this regard.
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Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Paul » 22 Feb 2012, 10:41

Thanks Gavin. I've been fairly busy these last few months but have regularly come here to read this forum and the (excellent) posts herein.

Before I comment on Salford/Manchester I would like to mention two incidents concerning the Police, which somewhat surprised me (because they are 'good' incidents) and uplifted me.

I suffered a burglary (or at least attempted) at my work premises in October. At around 2am one Saturday morning my home telephone rang, waking me from slumber. I had only nodded off about 1.30am so mustn't have been in a deep sleep. Thinking there could only be something wrong (family etc) I answered the phone with trepidation. It was Gtr Manchester Police ringing to tell me there had been a break-in at work ............. but that officers were in attendance and had arrested 3 intruders. Yes, I was surprised - by the latter fact, not the former. Not having the manpower (I can sympathise here) to leave an officer in attendance all night, I was asked could I attend to secure the premises. I did so (it's about a mile) and found a broken window and signs of intrusion. Lots of tools and equipment had been stacked near the entry point, awaiting removal. There was nobody at all present at this point, and the situation was rather eerie and a little unnerving. I began clearing up but couldn't attend to the damage too much as there are residential hoses nearby and the noise would have been an issue. Besides, it was pitch-black and freezing cold outside. I realised I would be there all night. I kept moving anyway, to keep warm and in fact did some other tidying up beyond what I may have otherwise done. Two police officers re-attended the premises around 5am. They took a statement, accepted my word that there was about £100 of damage (a fair estimate), took with them a glove and small torch I had discovered (presumably left by the intruders) and left, telling me 3 people were in custody and would be interviewed later that day. They were polite and sympathetic throughout. At around 9am I began to repair the damage which took about 2 hours to complete. Realistically it cost me about £20 in materials, the rest being my labour. Just before I left, dog-tired, at 12 noon, a female police officer attended for 'scene of crimes' photographs.

The following week I received a letter telling me that X,Y and Z (I was given their names) had been convicted in Magistrates Court (pleading guilty) of burglary and had been sentened to 8 weeks imprisonment each, suspended for 2 years, 12 weeks of curfew, 100 hours each of unpaid work and were ordered to pay me between them the sum of £100. I feel the sentence of imprisonment should have been active and not suspended and should have been for longer, but I have to say it was still a 'result' for me, in fact the only positive result I have ever had by way of criminal victimhood (vehicle crime, 2 other burglaries over the years, vandalism, etc). I was moderately pleased (as pleased as one can be in these circumstances). To date I have received £33 from the Courts as part of the compensation order. They will only have to pay a pound or two each per week of course, somthing else I feel should be more rigourous. Still .........

On Xmas Day last I went to a friend's house for Xmas dinner, arriving about 1pm. I had one drink all day (small glass of Baileys) and a large feed. At about 6.30pm I left with thanks and drove less than half a mile to go see my daughter (she's 20 and lives with her Mother from whom I am estranged). Just as I pulled up outside their house, I noticed a plain car had stopped alongside me, just slightly to the rear. As I opened the door, a man identified himself as a Police Officer (with ID) and asked if the vehicle was mine. Yes of course. I was asked my name and address and if the vehicle was registered to that address. Upon answering, the cop was polite and explained they were doing random checks for vehicle theft and that all I had told him checked out ok. He never mentioned drinking, though I am sure if I had smelt of alcohol or acted otherwsie as if I had been drinking, the breath-test kit would have emerged. We thanked each other, I alighted from the vehicle and they drove away quietly. I felt this was very neatly done (they startled me initially) and a positive thing, no matter the cost of Police officers prowling the streets on Xmas Day evening.

So, two incidents within weeks of each other where in my view the Police were efficient and doing things I like to see them doing. It's not always you may be able to commend the Police but at least for me, these incidents have cheered me somewhat.

I need to get back to work, so will comment on Salford/Manchester this evening. Sorry for going off-topic here, maybe the post better belongs elsewhere on the forum.

Thanks.
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Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Gavin » 20 May 2012, 22:17

This could just as well go in the multiculturalism thread as here, as the two topics seem to be related, but I will put it here...

Not long ago, I stayed in an area of London called Burnt Oak. This is in north London, but it no longer has anything remotely resembling a traditional English character, nor could anybody but the most deluded leftist seriously claim it has been enriched in any right and proper sense of the word. Just go there and have a look, if you can, because your own eyes will speak louder than my words.

Today, though, I am in Wembley, and I decided to get the bus here instead of the tube. For approximately 5 miles, the bus passed through areas that, apart from the decrepit architecture of the upper parts of the buildings, looked like they belonged to the developing world. They just did not resemble England at all. It was like a shanty town. To say it was run down would be an understatement.

I looked behind me on the bus several times and saw not a single person of my own culture. I didn't hear my own language either. I'm not sure the bus driver even understood me when I checked where the bus was going.

I got to my hotel, here in Wembley, and I thought what's going to happen? I felt sad. I thought of how London must have looked 100 years ago. That area just can't have been so bad. It just can't have been. There must have been more social cohesion too. I reflected on how we were never asked. No-one was ever asked if they wanted large areas of the country completely changed and overcome by, frankly, retrograde cultures. If they had been asked, they would have said no.

People who can, are fleeing London. I see no reason why that will not continue. I don't see how the economy or social infrastructure will be able to take this in the long term and I conclude that things will inevitably escalate to an endgame.
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Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Caleb » 21 May 2012, 03:23

The thing that did really surprise me about London when I moved there was the urban decay. I don't know if it was just that it seemed to be overcast all the time, but there was a general greyness and depressive quality about the urban landscape that seemed to be omni-presecent.

Also, I don't think it necessarily has to look this way (as certain non-indigenous cultures will take pride in their surroundings), but there was always a particular look to the high street. In some areas, there were always those shops that looked like they needed a good paint or scrub, and their windows were almost completely obscured by fading advertisements for cheap phone cards for calling the third world. Inside, aside from maybe one religious picture or saying in a picture frame, they were almost completely devoid of decoration and the walls were never painted (indeed, it looked like they were in a state of semi-permanent renovation), and the shops were extremely cluttered. They always had really narrow aisles (to maximise the number of shelves), and lots and lots of boxes, sacks, etc. that looked like they'd just been delivered and hastily placed on the floor. Except when you came back three days later, they were still there, or other things had replaced them.

Yet this is how shops actually are in the third world. There is a general chaos to them because there is a general chaos to those societies. There's a general chaos out on the streets too, and pavements (if they exist) end up getting co-opted as an extension of the shop/delivery zone, etc.

A couple of years before I left Australia, one of my friends (who was also a teacher, but extremely left-wing) moved into an area of Melbourne that was very ethnic. Anyway, he was telling me that the local shopping strip looked like it had been plucked right from Somalia or something of the sort (and it reminded me of those high streets in parts of London). Yet he was raving about the diversity of the area. I sort of raised an eyebrow and asked him if he intended to send his (then four year old) son to the local school, and he said yes. I asked him if he were worried about the educational standards, and he then told me he wasn't concerned because either 1) he and his wife were quite into intellectual things, so that would rub off on his kid, 2) he'd get into Melbourne Boys' High School (a selective school). I just raised an eyebrow again and thought, "Oh yeah."

The area he lived in had traditionally been quite a poor/working class area, but it had become very ethnically diverse. It struck me that as Australians have become richer over the past half-century, many areas that were once poor/working class, but have remained white (or had certain East Asians move in), have been gentrified, even if it's in a kind of tacky way. Some are actually really trendy or conveniently located, and so very wealthy people live there now. However, there's kind of a distinction with areas that haven't remained white. Those areas do look really shabby a lot of the time. I noticed it where my friend lived, and I noticed it in certain other areas also. I think part of the reason, which really can't be taken too lightly, is that even the shabbiest shop in a Western city is better than the nicest shop wherever they're from. We might think, "Grief! Look at this place!" but they probably send photos home to their families in the old country and everyone thinks, "Wow! Look at that place! He's really made it."
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Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Gavin » 16 Jun 2012, 21:51

Caleb wrote:The thing that did really surprise me about London when I moved there was the urban decay. I don't know if it was just that it seemed to be overcast all the time, but there was a general greyness and depressive quality about the urban landscape that seemed to be omni-presecent.


You're right, Caleb, the solid grey weather doesn't help matters. In Florida they have beaming sunshine every day and paint their buildings in pastels, but really we should do that here.

Let it not be thought for a moment that urban decay is unique to the third world immigrant population who dominate many areas of our cities. Although areas they inhabit tend to look like shanty towns, many Britons hold their own when it comes to allowing their environment, their own property and certainly that which is provided to them go to rack and ruin. We have problem enough with them, which is we don't need millions more dependents flowing in.

When I lived in Balham I paid more than £1,500 per month in mortgage on a small two bedroom flat in an old Victorian house which was in the Eighties (tragically, in my view) divided into flats. There was no clear management arrangement so whenever anything needed to be done, I just did it. It was too difficult to co-ordinate any of the other 10 residents of the building to bother. Mucking out the bins, cleaning the hall, painting the front wall. I just dread to think what it looks like now that I have moved out as I assume none of this is being done (actually I have been told by a neighbour it is not being done).

My fellow residents in this particular building were your trendy, indigenous, young types - some of them couples. All were paying a lot to live there, most owning their flats. The policy of Wandsworth council was to mix in the same street plenty of native underclass benefit recipients and immigrant Somalis. Every time I walked up and down this major road (and Balham is considered a desirable area) I would see filthy net curtains, some boarded up windows, paint peeling and so on. This would not be on every house, but on many.

I became quite annoyed about this as I came to put my flat on sale and wrote to Sadiq Khan MP to ask why it was that these properties were allowed to get into such a dilapidated state, thus bringing down the whole area. To his credit (though I would still like to see him unelected) he forwarded my letter to the local council. I received a reply saying that all of the properties concerned were owned by housing associations (they're council housing) and that the council had no legal right to do anything at all unless there was evidence of rats.

You can have bags of rubbish in your yard, broken down cars (these things were there) and peeling paint all over the place but nothing at all can be done.

Now, I am reliably informed that in Florida you can be fined for allowing your property to get into a state of disrepair. It's unsightly. It brings down house prices in the area. Yet in the UK nothing can be done. This speaks volumes about the UK.

Let us be perfectly clear that this has nothing to do with money. Paint is less that £5 a tin. I have done loads of DIY in the last year and nobody paid me anything. It didn't cost me much either. This is as pure an example as you will find of people just not caring. They simply cannot be bothered to do anything. And this is right across our country. I would like this law to be changed immediately. I think it is a disgrace. People can afford money for their cigarettes, alcohol, tattoos, phones and holidays in America (they tell me about these), while they let their environment rot. I think they should be thrown out on the street if they do not work to maintain their buildings.

Let me take you from Balham to the north-west, where I am now. I'm going to show you some photos of not far from where I live. Get ready. This town has not been bombed. Nobody is starving here. The pubs are busy. Like most British towns, the high street is populated by "pound shops" (every item £1), amusement arcades (casinos), betting shops and budget supermarkets selling frozen foods. Look at the residential buildings:


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You can see some rubbish in the photos there too, just dumped. I daily see hooded youths spitting and throwing rubbish metres from bins.

Through most windows you see 40 inch plasma screen TVs, through more than one a full size pool table installed in the front room.

The photos are sad to see, aren't they? And sad I'm living here! I am quite ashamed actually, but believe me this is not a long term plan. My life is somewhat surreal at the moment because I'm either around Piccadilly, Fortnum & Mason etc. or here. This town would not have been like this in the 50s though. The only reason it is now is that its residents just don't care, and the council don't either. Otherwise they would push for powers to compel owners to maintain their properties. It's really a disgrace, and it isn't just here - you should see inner city areas.

This urban decay is a symptom of the malaise of the UK. But for the local MP to argue for this to be sorted out would be for him or her to accuse many in the area of being slovenly wasters, which of course is exactly what they are. He's not likely to do this, or he'd lose his vote. What do you do about democracy when the majority want to live in a terrible way? That's a big one probably for another thread.

But what do people think about this specific problem? Words almost fail me. This country is literally physically, as well as socially, cracking and crumbling. To reiterate, this is nothing to do with money, and certainly nothing to do with "deprivation" or "discrimination" or any other of these stupid words the complicit Left like to throw around. It is idleness. It's shameful.
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Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Caleb » 18 Jun 2012, 01:09

It's definitely a real shame. The U.K. is one of those places that, in theory, I'd love to spend a lot of time seeing. It has such an incredible wealth of history from so many ages, both in places like museums, and also just in the architecture on the street. From a historical and architectural perspective, it might even be the most interesting country on the planet (certainly top five). Yet unfortunately, so many of the inhabitants have turned it into a living cesspool, so I won't go there again for some time.

The litter problem there constantly blew my mind away. I remember seeing it everywhere, and seeing people do it everywhere. The most absurd situations I encountered were one person taking the trouble to go to a bin, only to drop her rubbish beside the bin (it wasn't full) and on another occasion, me walking perhaps thirty metres down a train platform towards a rubbish bin and becoming accutely aware that everyone on the opposite platform was watching me in astonishment.

In my travels throughout Asia, I've seen an astounding amount of garbage, often right next to where people live. I actually found Southeast Asia to be really ugly as a result.

Yet it's all just a matter of attitude. Apparently, Australia used to have a litter problem in the 1970s, but the federal government started a campaign to change public attitudes. Then, in 1989, famous Australian sailor, Ian Kiernan, organised Clean Up Sydney Harbour (inspired by the amount of rubbish he saw in a sailing competition). Forty thousand volunteers turned up to help. The following year, he organised a national event, and 300,000 people turned up. He's organised all sorts of events since, with more than 7 million people helping. There is certainly litter in Australia, but it's a much smaller problem than in the U.K.
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Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Heather » 18 Jun 2012, 18:27

Gavin, those pictures look just like a town I drove through a couple of days ago while house-hunting. Absolutely revolting. Unlike the UK (from what I understand from this forum and Dalrymple), multiculturalism and third-world immigrants were not at all involved in the ruin of this town. Just general cultural degradation, and laziness.

A couple of weeks ago I visited some relatives that I grew up near, for the first time in a year and a half. I had always thought of them as keeping a somewhat clean house, so I was shocked at how grimy they had allowed it to become. The white bathroom door was actually blackened in the place that your hand naturally goes as you open it. An afternoon with a bottle of cleaner and a sponge would have left the entire place sparkling clean. They had just become blind to the problem through familiarity with it. I won't even get into the mess they allow their three untrained dogs to make, but several years ago that wouldn't have been tolerated. Looking back I guess they were always somewhat undisciplined people in all aspects of life, and recently it's apparently gotten out of control.

It seems to me that lack of discipline is at least one root of a lot of today's problems.
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Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Gavin » 18 Jun 2012, 19:15

Hi Heather and Caleb and thanks for your replies.

Yes, that is correct, in towns such as this the third world immigrants have not been responsible at all. This is home grown idleness. As previously mentioned, around 90% of the people here are tattooed, many smoke, most wear casual sportswear and indeed many are disabled. In most cases I expect this was brought upon themselves through smoking, bad diet and zero exercise.

This is a living (just!) example of what the non-prescriptive, non-judgemental welfare state has wrought.

Despite the vulgarity of many residents here, I supposed I would rather be among them than in an area which was 90% Nigerian, say, or in an Islamic cultural area. Although this is a perversion of how Western culture should be, we nonetheless share some kind of cultural base and speak the same language (approximately). A visit to most of the boroughs which ring London would show similar decay, but it seems somehow even worse when it is not even recognisable as British. The point being that surely we have enough home grown problems to deal with.

I think the worst thing about the situation is that an MP could probably do nothing about this without being voted out of office for "insulting" the residents of these dumps. I think by rights they should be cast out into the streets with their houses taken from them. Their plasma screen TVs should be auctioned off along with their PlayStations. The idleness of our underclass makes me ashamed to be British at all. But most of all I blame the same people Dalrymple does - the left wing intelligentsia who brought his about.
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Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Andrea » 18 Jun 2012, 21:14

That place looks terrible - I'm sorry to say I would be quite depressed - and even angry - to live in such a place. It is all down to sheer indolence and misplaced values. The inhabitants of that town seem to have plenty of money to go out to the pub every weekend but not enough to spend a few hours and a few quid on filler and paint. I guess the footie is more important! As you said, when I lived in the USA, my local council would fine, yes, FINE, anyone who didn't maintain their home and lawn. Why on Earth doesn't the council there do anything to stop it?
Andrea
 
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Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Gavin » 13 Jul 2012, 09:00

Elliott recently alerted me to this amazing photo gallery which chronicles decay in the city of Detroit.

It would be claimed, of course, that this was due to government underinvestment etc., but actually it has nothing to do with that. The people living there simply do not bother to maintain what they have. Probably they have no respect for the achievements of western civilisation, so they are content to see it go to wrack and ruin.
Gavin
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Location: Once Great Britain

Re: Urban decay in the UK

Postby Heather » 13 Jul 2012, 12:47

I lived near Detroit for five years. What a messed up place! The photographers did not exaggerate or choose the worst specimens. The people who care have moved out, leaving behind the people who either don't care or who actively destroy it.
Heather
 
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