The vulgarity of the British

Examples of social decline, especially in the UK

The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 19 Apr 2012, 09:46

I have moved these posts from Breaking at the Seams because that thread is really about native tolerance running out with regard to immigrants. I hope this thread may serve as a place to discuss incidents such as the horrible one below.

Welcome to McDonald's in Wigan, north west England. This is really quite sickening viewing but worth watching through, I think, to get a sense of the menacing atmosphere across the UK at street level now:



In my view the police could have arrested every single one of these people for violent affay, public disorder, and in some cases trespass and probably more. But this is England.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Elliott » 19 Apr 2012, 11:15

My god... the staff must have been terrified.

I see this only just happened and is now a Youtube thing. Here's a news report about it. There's a very interesting comment from 1:30 onwards:



At first the father seems like a decent, old-fashioned type, but then it's clear he's looking for any excuse for his daughter. Were all of the yobs on antidepressants?
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 19 Apr 2012, 11:45

Yes, absolute rubbish about the anti-depressants. Also the "letter of apology". For goodness' sake there needs to be law and order in the UK again. Never mind old people, even young people are frightened to go out after dark, and even in the daytime, now.

By the way, is it just me, or was there something predictable about the appearance of both the council leader and the police officer there? Something that that has been a contributory factor to all of this happening in the first place.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Elliott » 19 Apr 2012, 11:59

I'm not quite sure what you mean, Gavin. The fact that they were both women?
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 19 Apr 2012, 12:14

Yes, that's it, but not only women. Women are known to typically vote left wing more often than men do and I may be wrong but it looked to me like the woman councillor was probably a left winger and I wouldn't be surprised if a feminist too. It just seemed completely unsurprising that she should be the person at the top of the council.

Likewise the woman in the police didn't really have the, how can I put it, authority, that I would like to see from the police. She threatened that the perpetrators of this might "spend some time in a police cell". That of course would be a non-punishment.

I just thought it was further evidence of the feminisation of society and if we got a few men in there maybe they would be more inclined to sort this out and be more capable of doing so (if their hands are not tied by the law). The same goes for the incident in McDonald's actually. Maybe if there had been some men around to defend those women they could have put those guys down. But then of course we would have seen McDonald's being prosecuted.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Elliott » 19 Apr 2012, 12:54

I agree that "some time in a police cell" is no great punishment. I do think that physical punishment would have a great deterrent effect on yobbery, and provide some satisfaction for those people directly affected (or even just offended in principle) by yobs' behaviour. A while ago I wrote this:

Three years ago another school in my town had a series of vandalism attacks at night. The police could have installed temporary CCTV cameras, or even planted a few officers on the premises to wait for the perpetrator to strike again and give him a quiet beating (my personal preference). But this didn't happen.


But I think it should have happened.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 19 Apr 2012, 13:04

Elliott, I suppose it shouldn't have, but your post brought a smile to my face.

One day I will pull the topic vigilantism off the list and it can be discussed. I'm afraid we will have to come down against it, but law and order most certainly needs reasserting in the land, pretty much as a matter of emergency, as that video shows.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 20 Apr 2012, 16:50

Dalrymple has written a new article pertaining to this general issue.

It is important to note at this point that, of course, not all Brits are vulgar, but it is a trend to be vulgar now, one which seems to have set in and be growing like a cancer, and which nobody seems to be able to do anything about. As Dalrymple says, Brits have become notorious around the world for their vulgarity, they are an embarrassment to the rest of us, and something needs to be done about this.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Elliott » 08 May 2012, 02:00

Looks like the cream of Britain's young minds are now taking to public vulgarity.

Drunken Cambridge students cause havoc in public park

Participants began arriving at around 11.30am, many wearing university blazers and pushing trolley loads of alcohol. They then spent the afternoon getting recklessly drunk whilst taking part in bizarre initiation ceremonies.

Girls were seen drinking port through condoms, while others were held upside down as alcohol was poured into their mouths and some acted out sexual positions.

At 3pm, hundreds shouted and cheered as more than 20 male students with "war paint" on their faces engaged in a vicious fight during which blood was shed.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Paul » 08 May 2012, 07:19

Gavin wrote:Yes, absolute rubbish about the anti-depressants. Also the "letter of apology". For goodness' sake there needs to be law and order in the UK again. Never mind old people, even young people are frightened to go out after dark, and even in the daytime, now.

By the way, is it just me, or was there something predictable about the appearance of both the council leader and the police officer there? Something that that has been a contributory factor to all of this happening in the first place.



I live just 7 miles or so from Wigan (though I could live 7 miles from anywhere in England for this to be relevant) and it is becoming menacing for everyone. I'm not old really, though not necessarily 'young' either, but I've now decided never to drive through town again after say 10pm, particularly at weekends.

I went to work on Sunday to do some maintenance (I'm self-employed) and put in a good day, staying till about 10pm. Then I drove home, only a mile, and naturally went through the town centre on the way. The main street was choked with loud young people, no doubt in various states of intoxication. They were in the road and spilling into the road off the pavement, lots of them. Obviously I had to slow down from less than 20 mph to a near stop. They wouldn't move and one thug in particular eyeballed me as if to dare me to advance further. I realised that operating the horn would inflame a sudden dicey situation. I had to wait, engine idling and suddenly wondering what to do if a missile (glass, can or whatever) came my way. Very reluctantly the crowd parted and I edged my way past them .......... but not without one of the males suddenly lashing out with his foot and kicking the side panel of the van (a 3 year old Ford Transit). The panel is now dented, though not seriously. With relief I passed the group and accelerated away, but not without noticing in the wing mirror that two of the crowd now adopted a confrontational stance making warlike gestures in my wake. They instantly reminded me of either members of a barbarian horde ....... or gorillas when they adopt that aggressive stance to deter rivals or threats. Lots of wild arm movements, that kind of thing. I'm not sure someone didn't throw something, though by now I was 30 yards away and with relief about to turn right off the main street. Maybe something was thrown but generally and at anything, such as shop premises, rather than specifically at me.

I did notice in the local free newspaper just days earlier that this very area of the main street, and the pub and takeaway(s) in that area were specifically mentioned in relation to anti-social behaviour and public drunkenness. A police statement said that they were 'investigating' and would 'use all their powers to ensure the peace was kept'. Great. Except that not one policeman or vehicle was to be seen in the area, at 10pm, on a Bank Holiday weekend, on a pleasantly warm evening.

I won't drive through town ever again now at this time, or maybe at any time when there may be drunken revellers on parade. It's simply not worth a broken windscreen, or worse. There are other ways home, rather circuitous, but surely safer. It's like being in the Middle Ages and unable to travel certain paths without a well-armed escort.

And yes, that foolish politician in the video is just the type of creature we now have running the local council
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 08 May 2012, 09:24

What liberals need to get through their heads is that this is not at all uncommon now. It is not a few isolated incidents. It is widespread, the norm, commonplace in every English town now. Barbarity, threat of violence, rules. The normal civilised person is rendered powerless.

Whereas there used to be religion, family, decency - something! - governing people's personal behaviour, now that morality has been turned on its head, there is only the thin line of the law, and there is little reason for criminals be frightened of that. What did TD say? Only 5.5% of even reported crimes go detected in the UK. Of those criminals most will get away with cautions, a few will do half their terms in prison.

I look forward to the day when judges themselves are put on the stand for the way they have failed to rule over Britain and personally I hold every bleeding heart liberal morally accountable for the behaviour you had to put up with there, Paul.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Paul » 09 May 2012, 07:42

Just to add to the shock, I heard last night that there was a murder by stabbing just a few hundred yards away from my place of work, on a local council estate. This was at a 'party' that had been reputedly going on for two days! And yet most people on that estate are almost certainly unemployed and on benefits. A local told me that even as the area was being cordoned off by the Police, cars full of youths were still arriving with some kind of link to cocaine dealing or purchase. The victim is just 23, whilst the man now in custody for the offence is also just 23.

I since heard (off Mum) that another young man (22 I think) from the same estate has been charged with the murder by battery of a two-year old in Bolton two weeks ago.

Three weeks ago there was an armed robbery at a shop just two streets away from my Mothers. A customer in the shop was pistol-whipped to the ground. The culprit was also from the same estate and was also in his 20s.

This is surreal almost. The estate has always been a centre of petty crime but back when I was a teenager and twenty-something, serious violent crime wasn't an issue.

Yes, the young are frightening now. I fear to get seriously old and by then, it will be even worse. I fully support the restitution of Capital Punishment for certain murders.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 09 May 2012, 10:28

I used to think I saw some things in London, Paul, but you've got some gems here.

I would be told "Why can't you be more positive?" etc. - by people who lived far away from such things and who were not qualified to pass any opinion and should have just shut up and listened. Like Galsworthy said, "Idealism increases in direct proportion to distance from the problem".

Unlike your average left wing liberal, I feel for the victims on those estates, and for the old people who dare not even walk the streets in a supposedly civilised country.

The liberal fallacy is that they believe that the default state of human beings is one of kindness, benevolence and so on. That flies in the face of all evidence. We have systems in place to preserve civilisation - fragile ones. Human beings are fallible, and without rules and consequences they will "try it on". Over the last half century the socialists have removed most of the disincentives for this with the result of increased crime and suffering in the UK.

Even as a child you know when you've done wrong, don't you? You kind of respect when your parents give you a telling off, or make rules. If they didn't do that, or if you knew you could get around them, you'd lose respect for them. You'd do whatever you wanted. You'd probably mess your life up and be a nuisance to other people too. That's what's happened, in microcosm.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 20 May 2012, 22:34

I hope readers will excuse merely some reportage in this particular post. These are not extreme examples of vulgarity, just observations from today. Years ago, I would often write accounts like this for cathartic reasons and only I would ever see them. Now, I can post them from time to time here, because they are, after all, illustrative of our society.

From the small seaside town in the northwest where I now reside, I regularly travel down to London, my former home, if such it can be called. I always find a train journey in England to be instructive of the state of our society, and I will relay my observations during this particular journey.

As I sat down, a girl opposite said, regarding a trashy tabloid on the table: "You can move that - some other people left it. I don't read that". That's good, I thought, saying "No, I don't either". To my left there was a couple - a good looking woman and her man. She was reading Marie Claire and he was reading… a comic. He must have been about 40. He was reading a comic book and using 3D glasses. His partner/wife/girlfriend evidently saw nothing unusual or unattractive about this. Perhaps she herself read Harry Potter, the children's book, as many adults do.

Shortly after I had noted this, a couple arrived and occupied the seats next to me, without acknowledging me, as is normal in Britain. The man was a thug, the woman resembled a slimmer version of Katie Price, AKA Jordan. Both wore casual sportswear. The woman didn't read, the thug produced a PlayStation device from his bag and proceeded to play virtual football for most of the journey. At one point the pair went to get some food and returned to eat their salt and vinegar snacks for us all to smell, conversing loudly while they did so.

I found it interesting to note that their conversation revolved generally around sniping chit-chat about acquaintances and Britain's Got Talent. I am not often party to extended conversations among the underclass because usually even to look at them, never mind speak with them, is to risk affront and personal injury. I believe they dislike presentable and polite people even more than we dislike them. Thus it was interesting for me to observe the topics of which they spoke, fatuous though they were. I expect Dalrymple would confirm that these are typical topics of conversation.

When they had finished their meal, the woman did nothing and the thug put aside his PlayStation and produced a £600 iPad, proceeding to play the game Angry Birds. He bored of this after a few seconds and cast it aside. I reflected on the technology he had held in his hands, and marvelled at the purpose to which it was being put, and by whom. I wondered who had paid for this too. Today's thugs seem to want for nothing.

By this time, I was of course reminded of Dalrymple's many observations that adults are like children in today's Britain. I looked around me for a single male who was dressed as a man. I couldn't find one - they were all dressed in casual sportswear, while most of the women looked like Ke$ha Lite.

The ticket inspector came along. Surprise, surprise, the couple I have described did not have tickets, so they were obliged to buy them on the train. I smelled something and glanced back at the girl who had eschewed the red top tabloid. She was smothering her hands in hand cream and I could see from her iPod that she was now listening to Lady Gaga. Later, I could hear it too. So much for anti-tabloid attitude, then.

This was not a particularly bad train journey. I have even been compensated by Virgin for people loudly talking during the entire journey in the Quiet Zone carriage, but it perhaps gives readers some idea of what an average train journey is like in the UK.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Elliott » 20 May 2012, 22:54

I don't know why it is, Gavin, but I find it fascinating to read other people's accounts of life in Britain now. Of course it wouldn't be so interesting if the other people were liberals - maybe it's just a sense of solace I get knowing that other people feel the same as me.

But on a more "practical" level, there are interesting observations to be made.

The guy reading a comic with 3D glasses - this made me think of the man-cave and Ikea's ManLand (see feminism thread).

Re. adults reading children's books. This is an interesting idea because of its implications for the state of education and, of course, Britain's culture in general.

Re. conversation of the underclass... in my experience, chat about reality TV and contest shows is very widespread. Even people who, 20 years ago, would have regarded themselves as middle-class, now see nothing wrong in being interested in this kind of stuff, and proudly displaying that interest in public in the form of starting conversations about it. People are generally quite surprised when I say that I don't watch those shows, and I'm waiting for the first person to reply that I must think I'm something special. For now, there is still a silent acceptance that they are culturally beneath me.

Re. the thuggish man playing computer games... this has implications for the role of men in modern Britain, and for what the welfare state does to people, and for what modern culture does to people. It is very common now for men (of all ages) to spend much of their free time playing games.

There's also the issue of the access the underclass have to hi-technology. This is quite amazing nowadays. I don't know how it is so available to them, how they have the money. But as I said in the Future English thread, we are quickly becoming a race of "symbol-using iPhoners", barbarians dependent on iPods and the like.

This links with comments on Youtube etc. We've got an amazing technology, the product of countless geniuses and experts and breakthroughs, yet we use it merely to amplify our ignorance. The most uncultured, ignorant, undeserving people have access to stuff that only 20 years ago, the best people couldn't dream of having. Thank god it is so cheap, because it is so wasted on modern Man...!
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