Political correctness

A topic which pervades many others

Re: Political correctness

Postby Gavin » 05 Sep 2012, 21:02

Welcome to the forum, Andreas.

Yes, I don't think someone like Jared Taylor would last long at an American university. There seem to be some awkward truths in some of the things he says though - that's probably why he wouldn't be allowed there. The Left don't want any free discussion of these topics, especially if it might expose flaws in their thinking (or what they claim to think). It's hard to see how there can ever be any learning done, though, when only the same side of the argument is acceptable at any time. That's not free enquiry. That's like saying "You can choose any colour as long as it's blue".

This extends not only to the kind of issues Taylor discusses (crime rates between races, double standards and feminism) but also to linguistics, where prescriptivism is considered a cardinal sin. I wonder how the universities can eventually be freed from PC, because they are forming (or limiting) the worldviews of generations of graduates, who later discover that their first-hand experience of the world does not match up with what they were told. I suppose, as with the BBC, when things have reached rock bottom, a government is going to have to reintroduce some balance.
Gavin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3430
Joined: 27 Jul 2011, 18:13
Location: Once Great Britain

Re: Political correctness

Postby Caleb » 06 Sep 2012, 03:13

I don't see that government is the solution. Government (at least the bureaucracy, if not the politicians also) is almost certain to be stacked with the same kind of people as those causing the mischief at universities. The only real solution I see is a free market solution where universities sort themselves out or fail financially.
Caleb
 
Posts: 865
Joined: 20 Oct 2011, 04:44

Re: Political correctness

Postby Andreas » 14 Sep 2012, 17:26

Gavin:

You are correct that few universities in the U.S. would invite Jared Taylor to speak. A good example of the double standard or hypocrisy you mentioned occurred this past March at the University of California, Berkeley (a generally liberal-left university). A black student group invited Louis Farrakhan to speak; a controversial figure, to say the least. His speech apparently included threatening remarks about Jews and Asian Americans (people with an East Asian background). There were people who objected to his appearance at Berkeley but no significant protest.

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/L ... 407145.php

Several readers who posted comments in the San Francisco Chronicle correctly observed the hypocrisy in the fact that Berkeley allows an extremist like Farrakhan to speak, but of course would never allow someone like Jared Taylor to speak. So it is clear that there is not complete freedom of speech in liberal-left Berkeley.

Jared Taylor refers to uncomfortable, awkward truths about differences between ethnic groups in America that most people would prefer to avoid, but that merit an honest, open public discussion. He is correct to call for such a discussion, but even if no discussion is forthcoming, I suspect there are many people who no longer believe the widely disseminated leftist commonplace that lagging achievement by some groups is due only to discrimination or racism.

However, I find Taylor’s statements unsettling to the extent that he seems to be appealing to the values of tribalism rather than the values of civilization. I’d like to believe in the catholicity of Western civilization—that belonging to Western civilization does not depend only on one’s birth or ethnicity. Perhaps I will be proven wrong in this belief.
Andreas
 
Posts: 195
Joined: 04 Sep 2012, 22:31

Re: Political correctness

Postby Elliott » 15 Sep 2012, 03:02

Andreas wrote:Jared Taylor refers to uncomfortable, awkward truths about differences between ethnic groups in America that most people would prefer to avoid, but that merit an honest, open public discussion. He is correct to call for such a discussion, but even if no discussion is forthcoming, I suspect there are many people who no longer believe the widely disseminated leftist commonplace that lagging achievement by some groups is due only to discrimination or racism.

It is always risky to presuppose the views of other people, but I find myself doing the same thing. With the exception of liberals, who have a vested interest in "believing", I doubt that a majority of people today still believe that black people are the victims of "institutional racism", when they see day in day out our institutions trying their damnedest to accommodate black people. From affirmative action to general PC, it is obvious that blacks have, at worst, a level playing field and, at best, a positive advantage over whites - therefore, if they are not doing well, there is clearly some other reason, probably internal to black people themselves.

I was saying to a friend just the other week... "Why is it that if I say the words 'black neighbourhood', your mind will jump almost exclusively to associations like 'crime', 'poverty', 'gangs', 'drugs' and 'violence'? Why is there this persistent connection between black people and social dysfunction?"

If we want to help black people, we first have to answer that question, and answer it honestly, not on the basis of white/middle-class/colonial guilt.

However, I find Taylor’s statements unsettling to the extent that he seems to be appealing to the values of tribalism rather than the values of civilization.

That's an interesting point. I suppose it depends on whether Taylor is being malicious.

If he is being malicious, then, by "appealing to the values of tribalism" he is merely stirring up racial hatred, and we could probably write his views off as just a polite version of good old-fashioned racism.

If he is not being malicious, then his message is that a person's ethnicity will influence how fit they are for Western civilisation, and he is simply reporting what he sees as a fact.

Each of these is unsettling for me, personally. Either I'm listening to a well-spoken hate-monger, or I'm part of a civilisation that has doomed itself to a future of continuous ethnic conflict.
Elliott
 
Posts: 1800
Joined: 31 Jul 2011, 22:32
Location: Edinburgh

Re: Political correctness

Postby Gavin » 15 Sep 2012, 13:12

Elliott, I know what you mean.

Andreas, the double standards at that university remind me of those at the BBC.
Gavin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3430
Joined: 27 Jul 2011, 18:13
Location: Once Great Britain

Re: Political correctness

Postby Caleb » 18 Sep 2012, 07:04

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/wealthiest-americans-288-times-net-093200831.html

The thing I found disturbing was not that the rich are rich, but these bits:

The median household saw its net worth drop to $57,000 in 2010, down from $73,000 in 1983.

It wiped out half the wealth of a typical black household, leaving them with a median net worth of $4,900.

And the median wealth of Latino families plummeted 86.3% to $1,300.

This compares to $97,000 for white households.


From that article, I gather the following:

1. In the past two decades, the net worth of the average American household has actually declined approximately 1% p.a. That's bad enough in itself.

2. However, in 2010, white families were basically just shy of 20 times richer than black families, and almost 75 times richer than Latino families. Those are like first world vs third world statistics. If I told you that one group was 75 times, or even only 20 times, richer than another, you'd assume I were talking about people in a developed nation vs people in somewhere like Nigeria, Cambodia or Bolivia.

Further to this, if the average worker has been working for twenty years (so is approximately 40-45 years old), and not taking compounding and inflation into account, then:

3. The average black household has saved just $4.71/week (4,900/20/52).

4. The average Latino household has saved just $1.25/week (1,300/20/52)

According to this article, the average cost of a Big Mac in America is $4.20.

So, basically, if the average black family in the U.S. had bought one less Big Mac per week over the past two decades, their net worth would be slightly less than double what it is today. If the average Latino family had bought one less Big Mac per week over the past two decades, their net worth would be more than four times what it is today.

Really?!

People can sugar coat it however they like, but what a bunch of third world-esque knuckleheads.
Caleb
 
Posts: 865
Joined: 20 Oct 2011, 04:44

Re: Political correctness

Postby Andreas » 20 Sep 2012, 20:48

I just finished a book that I discovered by chance. While riding public transportation I happened to see a winsome and earnest young woman, obviously a college student, reading a book with an interesting title, “The Reluctant Fundamentalist.” I could see only the title and thought the book might be about Christian fundamentalists, but it is the work of a Pakistani writer (and U.K. citizen) Mohsin Hamid, and the cover image suggested that the subject was Islamic fundamentalism. Given the recent spate of anti-Western violence and the death of the U.S. ambassador to Libya, I thought it might be a worthwhile read.

The novella tells the story of a young Pakistani man from Lahore who attends Princeton University, works for a financial services firm in New York, has an unhappy romance with an American woman, and, after some time following the 9/11 attacks, becomes disillusioned with his work and American imperialism. He quits his job, returns to Pakistan, and becomes a university lecturer, helping to organize anti-U.S. protests.

The quality of the writing is uneven, not outstanding. The characters are shallow. The situation is contrived. Yet this novella was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2007 and has won other prizes. Could this be because it was written by a Pakistani author and expresses anti-American views, or at least views very critical of the U.S.? Because it appeals to readers of a certain left-liberal persuasion who think that America deserved the 9/11 attacks?

The customer reviews on the U.K. and U.S. Amazon websites are mostly gushing praise; few of them realize that the novella’s framework – an autobiographical monologue addressed to an unnamed American stranger, met by chance in a cafe – is not original. Mr. Hamid borrowed (or stole? since there is no acknowledgment by the author) the idea from Albert Camus and his novel “The Fall.”

The title is misleading (a lie? misleading readers to ensure better sales?). The narrator is not a fundamentalist; or at least, there is no indication that he is. There is no discussion of Islam or of fundamentalism in general. This book does nothing to explain the thinking of jihadists to benighted Westerners.

“The Reluctant Fundamentalist” presents most of its American characters in a flat, rather stereotypical way as culturally insensitive, selfish, superficial, and unaware. No doubt many Americans are. But not all of them, and in the present context, it made me wonder about what kind of person the U.S. ambassador to Libya, J. Christopher Stevens, was. What one can glean from news reports is that he spoke Arabic and French, had a degree in law, that his father was a judge and his mother a cellist. He had spent two years living in Morocco and his postings with the U.S. foreign service included Jerusalem, Damascus, Cairo, and Riyadh. Mr. Stevens was a man with a certain degree of culture and education who probably did more to promote genuine understanding between the West and the Muslim world in his abbreviated lifetime than Mr. Hamid will accomplish with his writings.
Andreas
 
Posts: 195
Joined: 04 Sep 2012, 22:31

Re: Political correctness

Postby Gavin » 24 Sep 2012, 20:54

I think we should take it as given now that there is a lot of crossover between threads and many are appropriate for a posting, or on more isolated topics new threads may of course be started.

Paul Weston has just written a saddening article on what amounts to a police cover-up of the Pakistani rape gangs who groomed strictly white females in the north of England in recent years.

This is the cost of political correctness. I have a question for board members: do you think the police are now "institutionally racist"? I think this story suggests that they are. Not the rank and file, who have to deal with these problems on the streets, but the senior police who are answerable to the politicians.
Gavin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3430
Joined: 27 Jul 2011, 18:13
Location: Once Great Britain

Re: Political correctness

Postby Elliott » 25 Sep 2012, 00:17

Good God... the examples there are astonishing, Gavin.

There is a sense that things are actually 10 times as poisonous in our country as they appear to be on the surface. How could something like this happen? How many people ignored their consciences to allow it to continue?

However, it does occur to me that, as far as we know, this only refers to the Rotherham area. It would be interesting to know if this kind of thing (both the crime and the cover-up) is common to many areas with high Muslim concentration. I suspect it probably is, if not at such a scale.

That aside, I will certainly be signing the BF petition for the men in charge of this shambles to resign. But that is hardly a fitting punishment for them. Thousands of child rape cases, directly because of their decisions? In a saner time, these men would be facing public execution.
Elliott
 
Posts: 1800
Joined: 31 Jul 2011, 22:32
Location: Edinburgh

Re: Political correctness

Postby Elliott » 04 Oct 2012, 03:42

Image

In case anyone cannot see the image above, it shows a parent with a pram, and another person asking whether the baby is a boy or a girl. The parent replies: "I don't know. It can't talk yet."

This image was uploaded onto Facebook by a group called "Wipe Out Transphobia". It was "liked" by a friend of mine who, back at art college, called himself a transvestite.

I am absolutely convinced that my friend was not a transvestite and most probably had no gender issues to speak of. I think he was doing it entirely to get attention. I only once saw him "as Elizabeth", whereas I daily saw him doing everything he could to get attention.

But, the way political correctness works, I have to take whatever he says about himself seriously. If he says he's a transvestite, he's a transvestite. And this means that, if he "likes" some stupid image like the one above, I have to assume it's because of his deeply-held convictions, not his ludicrous attention-seeking.

Of course, the rule of political correctness is actually shown in that image itself: we have to believe whatever the baby eventually says about "itself". If "it" says "it" is a boy even though it has a vagina, it's a boy - and vice versa.

It could almost make you long for the intifada, to wipe away all this nonsense and affectation.
Elliott
 
Posts: 1800
Joined: 31 Jul 2011, 22:32
Location: Edinburgh

Re: Political correctness

Postby Andreas » 10 Oct 2012, 20:54

Elliott,

This last post reminds me of an exhibit I saw round about the fall of 1982 at the Yale Center for British Art. A British artist (I don't remember her name) had put together an installation based on her infant's acquisition of language and first awareness of sex differences. Some of the "pictures" in the installation were framed pieces of her infant's diapers. The piece was called "Weaning from the Metaphase." The artist was present and gave a talk. I sat there with a group of academics and students, including very earnest-looking art history graduate students dressed all in black, while she went on about Lacanian psychoanalysis etc etc. I was much younger then, more naive than today, and hadn't yet read Dalrymple. I didn't realize then how absolutely self-indulgent this was, and how terribly exploitative of the artist's child.
Andreas
 
Posts: 195
Joined: 04 Sep 2012, 22:31

Re: Political correctness

Postby Gavin » 16 Oct 2012, 10:19

We can see that even some kind of perceived racism is apparently now the very worst speech or thought crime when even the obnoxious "comedian" Frankie Boyle thinks he has a case in sueing over the accusation!
Gavin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3430
Joined: 27 Jul 2011, 18:13
Location: Once Great Britain

Re: Political correctness

Postby Elliott » 05 Nov 2012, 03:01

Fans of Downton Abbey beware.
Elliott
 
Posts: 1800
Joined: 31 Jul 2011, 22:32
Location: Edinburgh

Re: Political correctness

Postby Gavin » 05 Nov 2012, 11:10

That really is PC but I'm surprised they have managed to get away with a monocultural series for so long (it's tremendously popular). I see the moderators have been deleting comments en masse:

Someone wrote:Wow, this thread disappeared quicker than British history under the multicultural orthodoxy.
Gavin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3430
Joined: 27 Jul 2011, 18:13
Location: Once Great Britain

Re: Political correctness

Postby Elliott » 05 Nov 2012, 12:12

It seems they have now deleted the entire comment thread and locked it. So even Britain's most right-wing paper will not allow you to comment on Britain's history being black-washed.
Elliott
 
Posts: 1800
Joined: 31 Jul 2011, 22:32
Location: Edinburgh

PreviousNext

Return to Political Correctness

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

User Menu

Login Form

This site costs £100 per year to run and makes no money.

If you would like to make a small contribution to help pay for the web hosting, you can do so here.

Who is online

In total there is 1 user online :: 0 registered, 0 hidden and 1 guest (based on users active over the past 5 minutes)
Most users ever online was 175 on 12 Jan 2015, 18:23

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest
Copyright © Western Defence. All Rights Reserved.